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JMS-S3000 SpiralTOF™ Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

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MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometer Incorporating a New Spiral TOF Ion Optic System Capable of High Resolution Mass Analysis over a Wide Molecular Weight Range

The JMS-S3000 is a MALDI-TOF MS incorporating JEOL’s unique Spiral TOF ion optic system. Featuring unprecedented levels of mass resolution and sensitivity, the system has been acknowledged for its distinctive capabilities in many scientific studies.

The JMS-S3000 is a leading analytical tool, suitable for changing research needs in areas of synthetic polymers, material science, and biological polymers.

High mass resolution and sensitivity over a wide molecular weight range
Since many of synthetic polymers and protein digests have varied molecular weight distributions, analysis of such samples requires high mass resolution and sensitivity in a wide molecular weight range. The JMS-S3000, incorporating JEOL’s unique Spiral TOF ion optic system, is superior to others in these areas.

Optional linear TOF
This enables measurement of high molecular weight ions and analysis of samples subject to self-fragmentation.

Optional TOF/TOF
This configuration enables MS/MS analysis by high energy collision-induced dissociation. The system, featuring a high precursor ion selection capability, allows the operator to select and monitor only monoisotopic ions in product ion spectral data. It is especially effective for analysis of complex product ion spectra.
Product JMS-S3000 SpiralTOF™ Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer
Company Jeol Ltd
Price Request a quote
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Jeol Ltd
1-2 Musashino 3-Chome Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 Japan

Tel: +81 4254 31111
Fax: +81 4254 63353

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