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  Events - March 2013


5th Ocular Diseases Drug Discovery

21 Mar 2013 - 22 Mar 2013 - San Francisco, USA



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The Ocular Diseases & Drug Development Conference taking place on March 21-22, 2013 in San Francisco, CA is now in its fifth year. As chairperson and moderator, I look forward to attending this conference. It continues to offer presentations on novel and innovative therapeutics in ocular drug development and discovery. This year we are fortunate to have Dr. Samir Patel, CEO and President of Ophthotech, as our keynote speaker. A leader in the field, Dr. Patel, a trained retina specialist, will present data from his recent clinical studies on a new and adjunct treatment for wet AMD, Fovista. We have two panels at this year's conference: 1) a safety regulatory panel with experts in the field being moderated by Dr. Ken Mandell and 2) a VC/ BD panel being moderated by Dr. Emmett Cunningham. This forum allows for excellent networking, the exchange of ideas, and sharing of challenges; all with a united common goal of bringing new and innovative treatments to patients in the area of ophthalmology.

The conference features the following topics:

Session: Novel Targets, Developments and Technologies

Session: Novel Drug Delivery Methods to the Anterior and Posterior Segments

Session: Clinical Development Advances & Updates 

Session: Safety Assessment and Regulatory Landscape in Ocular Drug Development

Session: Short Presentations

Panel Discussion: BD, Investments and Potential for Collaborations

Panel Discussion: Safety and Regulatory in Ocular Development



Further information
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