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Dow CEO says Manufacturing Renaissance is Within Reach

Published: Thursday, April 04, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, April 04, 2013
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Andrew Liveris, chairman, and ceo of The Dow Chemical Company (Dow) has called upon chemical engineers to reclaim their mantle as the world’s biggest problem solvers.

But Liveris, who was speaking in London, UK last night, also warned that too many governments lack a coherent energy policy and were not working closely enough with industry or the public.

“Optimism is returning to the U.S. economy and it is because of the manufacturing sector,” said Liveris.

”In the UK, the manufacturing industry has remained somewhat insulated from the overall downturn and the downstream industry is well placed to be part of a global manufacturing renaissance.

“The chemical industry is at the vanguard of a manufacturing revolution, but we cannot work in a silo. Private and public sectors must work as equal partners to establish enduring frameworks that enable business to innovate solutions, create jobs, and generate growth for the long term – to collaborate across boundaries, across industries, across markets and value chains, across disciplines, across all discontinuities.”

He went on to dismiss debates over large or small governments, citing the need for ‘smart government’ regardless of size and warned that excessive regulation in order to attract and maintain inward investment was short-sighted.

“What we need now is innovation, new business models, a set of new and great solutions for daunting problems. We also need bold leaders, collaborating across outdated divisions between what is best for companies and what is best for countries,” said Liveris.

“We need leaders innovating new ways to make the world a healthier, more productive place for generations to come. That is how we manufacture a new foundation for economic growth and how we fuel the engines of economic growth at the same time.”

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