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Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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Progressing 3D Spheroid Analysis into a HTS Drug Discovery Method
Sarah Kessel, Eric Sincoff, Olivier Dery, Lori Fitton

3D Tumorspheroid models for improved predictivity in cancer drug discovery.

Gut Microbial Metabolites and Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolism: A High Throughput Screening Approach
Glynn Martin, James Sidaway, Jonathan Swann

This poster highlights the combination of metabonomics and high throughput screening by the identification of gut microbial metabolites and a screening assay designed to determine their cytotoxicity to liver-like cell cultures.

Human Cardiomyocytes Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: High Throughput and High Content Assessment of Cardiac Toxicity and Drug Efficacy by Monitoring Cytosolic Free Calcium Transients
1Kettenhofen R, 1Duenbostell A, 2Niedereichholz T, 3D’Angelo JM, 4Horai H, 5Schwengberg S, 1Bohlen H, 6Licher T"

Introduction of selected, pure human cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSCM) into a calcium transient imaging high throughput screening (HTS) assay to assess cardiotoxicity and drug efficacies.

Novel Gpr39 Agonists: Correlation Of Binding Affinity Using Label-Free Back-Scattering Interferometry With Potency In Functional Assays
Daniel Brown (1), Niklas Larsson (2), Ola Fjellström (3), Anders Johansson (3), Sara Lundqvist (2), Johan Brengdahl (2), and Richard J. Isaacs (1)

We describe the application of back-scattering interferometry (BSI) to the characterization of small molecule ligand binding to human GPR39 (a GPCR targeted for type-2 diabetes therapy) overexpressed in crude membrane fractions in free solution, including how BSI-derived affinity and functional assay-derived potency correlate for compounds of varying scaffolds.

Mixtures Analysis of Complex Mixtures
Michael Bernstein; Carlos Cobas; Santi Domínguez; Manuel Pérez; Agustín Barba

We describe an NMR method to quantify mixture components in wine, edible oils, etc. The method is fully customizable, and amenable to high throughput operation.

Novel Gpr39 Agonists: Correlation Of Binding Affinity Using Label-Free Back-Scattering Interferometry With Potency In Functional Assays
Daniel Brown (1), Niklas Larsson (2), Ola Fjellström (3), Anders Johansson (3), Sara Lundqvist (2), Johan Brengdahl (2), and Richard J. Isaacs (1)

We describe the application of back-scattering interferometry (BSI) to the characterization of small molecule ligand binding to human GPR39 (a GPCR targeted for type-2 diabetes therapy) overexpressed in crude membrane fractions in free solution, including how BSI-derived affinity and functional assay-derived potency correlate for compounds of varying scaffolds

MAB Discovery Technology: A Smart Way to Highly Diverse and Functional Therapeutic Antibodies
Hans-Willi Krell

MAB Discovery GmbH developped a highly integrated process which provides diverse antibodies by starting with a high number of B cells and filtering the relevant antibodies by an early-on functional screening.

PRESEPSIN, A SOLUBLE CD14-SUBTYPE, A POSSIBLE NEW BIOMARKER INCREASES IN SEPTIC PATIENTS’ PLASMA FROM PEDIATRIC DEPARTMENT.
Hayato YAMAGUCHI1), Satoshi KIMURA1), Seiji FUKUOKA1), Emiko NAKAMA1), Hideyasu OTO2), Makoto INOUE2), Takashi SOGA2), Shigetaka KITAZAWA2), Yoh UMEDA2)

Increased plasma concentration of soluble CD14-subtype (presepsin) was observed in pediatric patients with bacteremia. Presepsin could be a possible biomarker of sepsis in pediatric patients, however, their reference interval in children could be lower than that of adults. More studies with larger number of samples are required to confirm the result.

A Novel Approach Toward Microfluidic Drug Metabolite Synthesis – Electrosynthetic Methodology Simulating Cytochrome (CYP450) Oxidation
Romain Stalder, Gregory P. Roth and Philip Podmore

A novel microfluidic technology and electrochemical synthesis method is demonstrated for the efficient generation of known drug metabolites. These metabolites are typically generated on first pass hepatic oxidation in vivo. The FLUX Module, a new microfluidic electrochemical cell manufactured by Syrris Ltd., has been employed to generate the metabolites of five commercial drugs: Tolbutamide, Chlorpromazine, Diclofenac, Primidone and Albendazole.

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Showing Results 11 - 20 of 159
Scientific News
Misfolded Proteins Clump Together in a Surprising Place
Stowers researchers create new framework for protein aggregation under acute stress.
Nanoparticle Research Could Enhance Drug Delivery Through Skin
A milestone study from the University of Southampton could have major implications for the delivery of drugs.
Chemists Recruit Anthrax to Deliver Cancer Drugs
With some tinkering, a deadly protein becomes an efficient carrier for antibody drugs.
Protein ‘Map’ Could Lead to Potent New Cancer Drugs
Findings will help scientists to design drugs that could target NMT enzyme.
Animal Testing can Mislead Drug Discovery and Development
Several blockbuster drugs would not be on the market, if scientists had relied solely on drug-uptake in animal trials, according to new research.
Synthesis and Bioactivity of Analogues of Tropodithietic Acid
The study suggests that the sulfur atoms in the marine antibiotic TDA are not essential for bioactivity, but different modes of action for TDA and its sulfur-free analogue cannot be excluded.
Cancer-Fighting Drugs Might Also Stop Malaria Early
A number of compounds have been identified which could be used to fight malaria.
Collaboration Leads to Possible Shortcut to New Drugs
The reaction, reported in Science, demonstrates how a carboxylic acid can be transformed into a very reactive site through use of a novel photoredox catalyst.
Catalysts That Mimic Enzymes Could Revolutionize Pharmaceutical Manufacturing
Structures made of polymer chains allow the catalysts to work in water.
Discovery of How Taxol Works Could Lead to Better Anticancer Drugs
The drug’s interference with the normal function of microtubules could help in designing better anticancer drugs.
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