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Polymer Microarrays for Biomaterial Development
Simmonte, M.J.1, Dhaliwal, K.2, Cuschieri, K.3, Graham, S.V.4, Bradley, M.1

The application of polymer microarrays in the discovery of biocompatible and bioactive substrates. Progress towards biomaterial development for the treatment of SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome), and improving cervical cytology.

DETERMINATION OF THE QUALITY OF ACTIVE INGREDIENTS IN PAIN KILLERS USING GC-MS
Elizabeth N.M Murago1, Nathan Oyaro1, Anthony N. Gachanja, Onditi O. Anam, Felix M. Mawili, Steve Lancaster

From this study, the pain killers sampled were found to have large error bars suggesting that there exist counterfeit drugs in the market. The brands mostly affected for analysis of acetaminophen were panadol, action, P500, P5500, elymol and neladol. The error bars for caffeine analysis were quite low indicating that all tablets either counterfeit or original maintained the same amount of this active ingredient.

Human iPSC-derived hepatocytes and cardiomyocytes for drug toxicity testing
AnnandRR; Vardaro R; Hamilton B; Akakira R; Tamura K; Yoshida S; Lin YC; Toyoda D; Kogami H; Okuda Y; Watanabe T; Inamura M

Human iPS-derived hepatocytes (ReproHepato™) and cardiomyocytes (ReproCardio 2™) are useful for in vitro toxicity assays.

Applications of scCO2 as a “Green” Solvent in the Textile Industry
A. Lutz, A. Kaziunas, R. Schlake, M. Anand, and J.P. Hobbs

Using Supercritical CO2 to dye textiles.

Using Cresset to grow and link distant fragment hits with sensible chemistry
M J Slater; T Cheeseright

We describe a further extension to our fragment growing methodology to aid fragment optimisation through linking fragments that have been shown to bind to distinct (distant or adjacent) pockets.

A multi-resonances valveless micropump with high fluid transportation efficiency
Ming-Che Hsieh, Min-Fan Huang, and An-Bang Wang

A multi-resonances valveless micropump equipping with inlet/outlet elastic chambers of intendedly-designed stiffness was successfully realized to solve the low efficiency problem. Besides, a theoretical model based on Hydraulic-electrical-Analogy was also proposed to precisely predict its characteristics of dynamic behavior.

Rate and Mechanistic Investigation of Eu(OTf)2-Mediated Reduction of Graphene Oxide at Room Temperature
Tufan Ghosh, Sandeepan Maity and Edamana Prasad

Eu(OTf)2 has been introduced as an efficient reagent for the reduction of graphene oxide. Details kinetic studies have been performed which suggests that, the method is more efficient compared to that of other commonly used reduction methods.

Droplet-on-Demand Platform for Biochemical Screening & Drug Discovery
L.D. van Vliet1*, F. Gielen1, A. Sinha2, B.T. Koprowski3, J.B. Edel4, X.Niu5, A.J. deMello3, F. Hollfelder1, & J. Motschman2

To demonstrate droplet on demand applications towards study of biological entities encapsulated in nanoliter droplets. Interfacing a droplet on demand platform with microfluidic chips allows for merging and dilution of droplets. This feature is applied to encapsulate yeast cells (S. cerevisiae) and multicellular organisms (C. elegans).

Direct Targets Identification of a Bioactive Compound
Sylvain Blanc, Paul Bradley, Marie-Edith Gourdel, Michael Cholay, Gisèle Guimèse, Mike Mckenzie, George Nasi, Jean-Christophe and Barbara Ruggiero

Identifying protein partners of a small bioactive molecule is of great
interest in many aspects of life sciences and specifically in the drug
discovery and development process cycle. It is a support to (i) decipher
the mechanism of action after for example a “High Content” screening,
(ii) study “off-target” effects, (iii) adjust therapeutic indications and
clinical regimens of a drug and (iv) consider drug repositioning.

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Showing Results 11 - 20 of 196
Scientific News
Keeping Tumor Growth at Bay
Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis found a way to keep a cancerous tumor from growing by using nanoparticles of the main ingredient in common antacid tablets.
Future of Medicine Could be Found in a Tiny Crystal Ball
A Drexel University materials scientist has discovered a way to grow a crystal ball in a lab. Not the kind that soothsayers use to predict the future, but a microscopic version that could be used to encapsulate medication in a way that would allow it to deliver its curative payload more effectively inside the body.
Improving Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drugs Using Nanoparticles
A technology that could forever change the delivery of drugs is undergoing evaluation by the Technology Evaluation Consortium™ (TEC). Developed by researchers at Northeastern University, the technology is capable of creating nanoparticle structures that could deliver drugs into the bloodstream orally – despite the fact that they are normally poorly soluble.
Faster Drug Discovery?
Startup develops more cost-effective test for assessing how cells respond to chemicals.
New Mechanism of Antitumor Action Identified
A team of UAB researchers and collaborators from the Catalan biotech company Ability Pharmaceuticals (UAB Research Park), have described a new mechanism of anti-tumour action, identified during the study and development of the new drug ABTL0812.
Nanoparticles Deliver Tumor Suppressors to Damaged Livers
UT Southwestern Medical Center chemists have successfully used synthetic nanoparticles to deliver tumor-suppressing therapies to diseased livers with cancer, an important hurdle scientists have been struggling to conquer.
Experimental Combination Surprises with Anti-HIV Effectiveness
A compound developed to protect the nervous system from HIV surprised researchers by augmenting the effectiveness of an investigational antiretroviral drug beyond anything expected.
A New Type of Anticancer Agent
Success in the development of a ?-tubulin specific inhibitor.
Nanoparticles Proven Effective Against Antibiotic-Resistant “Superbugs”
In the ever-escalating evolutionary battle with drug-resistant bacteria, humans may soon have a leg up thanks to adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy developed by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder.
Versatile New Molecule-Building Technique
Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have devised a new and widely applicable technique for building potential drug molecules and other organic compounds.
SELECTBIO

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