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Identification and Characterization of Strain Specific Drug Target by Subtractive Genome Analysis of Methicillin Resistance Staphylococcus aureus
Kiran Saeed and Reaz Uddin

This study aimed to identify and characterize strain specific essential protein targets, which will eventually help in the identification of druggable proteins in two strains of MRSA by using different Bioinformatic tools and databases. We adopting a subtractive genome approach within the domain of Computational Biology.

Low cost, low footprint, expandable automated biobanking solutions
James Craven, Chris Morris, Maud Godfrey, Danielle Miller

This case study describes how TTP Labtech’s comPOUND storage modules have been employed by Abcam, a worldwide supplier of antibodies. Here, the turnaround time of sample placement and retrieval is an essential component for high quality service to its customers.

Stable N-phosphorylated triazol-5-ylidenes
Kirilchuk,A. A.; Marchenko,A. P.; Koidan, H. G.; Zarudnitskii, E. V.; Huryeva, A. N.; Yurchenko, A. A.; Kostyuk, A. N.

Considering probable generality of “carbene” mechanism for 1,3-azoles, investigation of intermediates of phosphorylation of 1,2,4-triazoles is of interest.

Reaxys Xcelerate – Less Searching. More Discovery
Keshav Dutt Sharma

Reaxys Xcelerate is a new premium version of Reaxys. Reaxys is a web based workflow tool for synthetic chemists. It is designed to support the optimization of synthetic processes and offers a valuable resource for accurate & validated experimental reaction & substance data.

Improved Ligation Specificity with Chemically Modified Ligation Components
Sabrina Shore, Alexandre Lebedev, Elena Hidalgo Ashrafi, Gerald Zon, Natasha Paul, Richard Hogrefe

Ligases are gaining utility in molecular biology applications, such as nucleotide sequence detection, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, protein detection and “next generation” sequencing by ligation.

Novel Antimalarial Drug Candidates Generated In Silico by Analysis of Public HTS Data
Robert Fraczkiewicz, Michael S. Lawless, Robert D. Clark, and Walter S. Woltosz

This research aims to provide proof-in-principle that in silico tools could be applied to public data so as to efficiently identify active chemistry with good ADMET properties.

Finally, a User-Friendly Way of Computing and Presenting Individual Group Contributions to Polyprotic Ionization of Drugs
Robert Fraczkiewicz, Marvin Waldman, Robert D. Clark

It is tempting to “assign” the macroscopic ionization constants (apparent pKa‘s obtained from titration experiments) of molecules to specific ionizable groups; however, this is strictly appropriate only in the case of monoprotic molecules.

Analyzing Molecular Polar Surface Descriptors to Predict Blood-Brain Barrier Permeation
Sergey Shityakova, Winfried Neuhausa, Thomas Dandekarc and Carola Förstera

Permeation of active drugs across the vascular brain endothelium into the central nervous system (CNS) is controlled by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Some molecular quantities like polar surface (PS) descriptors are of key interest to medicinal chemists to predict the BBB permeation fate for different drug-like chemical compounds.

Classification of Drugs by CNS Access: An Insight from Quantitative Blood-Brain Transport Characteristics
Kiril Lanevskij, Pranas Japertas and Remigijus Didziapetris, Advanced Chemistry Development Inc.

Aim of this study was to identify relationships between quantitative blood-brain transport parameters and qualitative data indicating whether the compound penetrates into the brain efficiently enough to exhibit action in the CNS.

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Showing Results 71 - 80 of 196
Scientific News
Keeping Tumor Growth at Bay
Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis found a way to keep a cancerous tumor from growing by using nanoparticles of the main ingredient in common antacid tablets.
Future of Medicine Could be Found in a Tiny Crystal Ball
A Drexel University materials scientist has discovered a way to grow a crystal ball in a lab. Not the kind that soothsayers use to predict the future, but a microscopic version that could be used to encapsulate medication in a way that would allow it to deliver its curative payload more effectively inside the body.
Improving Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drugs Using Nanoparticles
A technology that could forever change the delivery of drugs is undergoing evaluation by the Technology Evaluation Consortium™ (TEC). Developed by researchers at Northeastern University, the technology is capable of creating nanoparticle structures that could deliver drugs into the bloodstream orally – despite the fact that they are normally poorly soluble.
Faster Drug Discovery?
Startup develops more cost-effective test for assessing how cells respond to chemicals.
New Mechanism of Antitumor Action Identified
A team of UAB researchers and collaborators from the Catalan biotech company Ability Pharmaceuticals (UAB Research Park), have described a new mechanism of anti-tumour action, identified during the study and development of the new drug ABTL0812.
Nanoparticles Deliver Tumor Suppressors to Damaged Livers
UT Southwestern Medical Center chemists have successfully used synthetic nanoparticles to deliver tumor-suppressing therapies to diseased livers with cancer, an important hurdle scientists have been struggling to conquer.
Experimental Combination Surprises with Anti-HIV Effectiveness
A compound developed to protect the nervous system from HIV surprised researchers by augmenting the effectiveness of an investigational antiretroviral drug beyond anything expected.
A New Type of Anticancer Agent
Success in the development of a ?-tubulin specific inhibitor.
Nanoparticles Proven Effective Against Antibiotic-Resistant “Superbugs”
In the ever-escalating evolutionary battle with drug-resistant bacteria, humans may soon have a leg up thanks to adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy developed by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder.
Versatile New Molecule-Building Technique
Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have devised a new and widely applicable technique for building potential drug molecules and other organic compounds.
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