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Agilent and Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology Collaborate

Published: Friday, November 01, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, November 01, 2013
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Neurometabolomics Center will use Agilent's bio-analytical instruments in research of biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis of brain diseases.

DGIST is one of Korea's foremost universities and research institutions.

Neurometabolomics is the set of biochemical reactions that rely on oxygen and glucose in order for the brain to perform its tasks. At the new center, scientists and researchers will analyze changes in the metabolic materials of brain cells and examine their impact on the body's physiological functions and behaviors.

The center, which opens today, will serve as a hub of shared expertise, including the research capabilities of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Metabolism and Obesity Research in the United States and major medical institutions and hospitals in Daegu.

"The Neurometabolomics Excellence Research Center will help sharpen South Korea's edge in brain science and allow DGIST to contribute significantly to world-leading research," said the DGIST Research Center Director, professor Eun-Kyoung Kim. "By working with Agilent, we can continue to spearhead developments and research in brain science."

"The brain is arguably the most important organ in the human body, and Agilent supports the quest to help scientific and medical communities further neuroscience discovery for the good of mankind," said Rod Minett, general manager of Agilent's life sciences business in South Korea and the South Asia Pacific region.

The center, located in Daegu, plans to conduct neurometabolomics research projects involving other fields of studies such as medicine, neurobiology, statistics, computer science and systems biology. There will be potential joint research with major educational and medical institutions elsewhere in South Korea, Singapore and Australia. The center will also train and develop scientists, researchers and chemists to fill the need for skilled talent in neuroscience research.

Agilent and DGIST have worked together since late 2012, with Agilent providing DGIST with early access to novel technology and software development for its research needs.

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