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Protea Announces HRAM Analytical Services

Published: Tuesday, June 17, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, June 17, 2014
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Adds HRAM to its mass spectrometry based molecular imaging and LC-MS bioanalytical services portfolio.

Protea Biosciences Group, Inc. has announced that it is now offering High Resolution and Accurate Mass [HRAM] analysis on a Thermo Scientific Q Exactive™ Orbitrap mass spectrometer for both LAESI mass spectrometry imaging and for demanding bioanalytical applications that require HRAM technology, typically metabolomics, lipidomics, and proteomics type applications.

“HRAM is a very powerful tool for bioanalysis of both small and large molecules and is particularly suited to qualitative and quantitative analyses of samples in very complex biomatrices, making the Q Exactive an ideal technology platform for both biomarker discovery and validation.” said Dr. Greg Kilby, Protea’s Director of Molecular Imaging and Bioanalytical Services.

He added, “Protea provides our clients unprecedented access to State-of-the-Art technology platforms, such as the Q Exactive Orbitrap mass spectrometer, and innovative approaches to demanding biological applications through a unique combination of mass spectrometry imaging and LC-MS.”

Recent examples of applying HRAM analysis and LAESI mass spectrometry to areas such as high throughput fatty acid and lipid profiling of fungal spores will be presented at the American Society of Mass Spectrometry Annual Conference in Baltimore, MD.

The Conference will take place at the Baltimore Convention Center, located at 1 West Pratt Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 from Sunday June 15th through Thursday June 19th.

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