Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Metabolomics & Lipidomics
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Single Enzyme is Necessary for Development of Diabetes

Published: Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Last Updated: Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Bookmark and Share
12-LO enzyme promotes the obesity-induced oxidative stress in the pancreatic cells.

An enzyme called 12-LO promotes the obesity-induced oxidative stress in the pancreatic cells that leads to pre-diabetes, and diabetes. 12-LO’s enzymatic action is the last step in the production of certain small molecules that harm the cell, according to a team from Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis.

The findings will enable the development of drugs that can interfere with this enzyme, preventing or even reversing diabetes. The research is published ahead of print in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Nearly 40 percent of Americans-more than 120 million people-have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Diabetes results when the pancreas fails to produce sufficient insulin to remove sugar from the blood.

“We surmised that when individuals eat high fat foods and become overweight, the beta cells of their pancreases fail to produce sufficient insulin,” says principal investigator Raghavendra Mirmira. In earlier studies, these researchers and their collaborators at Eastern Virginia Medical School showed that 12-LO (which stands for 12-lipoxygenase) is present in these cells only in people who become overweight.

The harmful small molecules resulting from 12-LO’s enzymatic action are known as HETEs, short for hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. HETEs harm the mitochondria, which then fail to produce sufficient energy to enable the pancreatic cells to manufacture the necessary quantities of insulin.

For the study, the investigators genetically engineered mice that lacked the gene for 12-LO exclusively in their pancreas cells. Mice were either fed a low-fat or high-fat diet.

Both the control mice and the knockout mice on the high fat diet developed obesity and insulin resistance. The investigators also examined the pancreatic beta cells of both knockout and control mice, using both microscopic studies and molecular analysis. Those from the knockout mice were intact and healthy, while those from the control mice showed oxidative damage, demonstrating that 12-LO and the resulting HETEs caused the beta cell failure.

Mirmira notes that fatty diet used in the study was the Western Diet, which comprises mostly saturated-“bad”-fats. Based partly on a recent study of related metabolic pathways, he says that the unsaturated and mono-unsaturated fats-which comprise most fats in the healthy, relatively high fat Mediterranean diet-are unlikely to have the same effects.

“Our research is the first to show that 12-LO in the beta cell is the culprit in the development of pre-diabetes, following high fat diets,” says Mirmira. “Our work also lends important credence to the notion that the beta cell is the primary defective cell in virtually all forms of diabetes and pre-diabetes.”

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
Newly Identified Biochemical Pathway Could Be Target for Insulin Control
Researchers at Duke Medicine and the University of Alberta are reporting the identification of a new biochemical pathway to control insulin secretion from islet beta cells in the pancreas, establishing a potential target for insulin control.
Dirty,Crusty Meals Fit for (Long-Dormant) Microbes
Researchers apply the latest analytical techniques to further our understanding of desert biocrusts.
CSI -- On The Metabolite's Trail
Bioinformaticians at the University of Jena make the most efficient search engine for molecular structures available online.
Developing a Breathalyzer-Type Low Blood Sugar Warning Device For Diabetes
A multidisciplinary team of researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has been awarded a $738,000 National Science Foundation grant to develop a breathalyzer-type device to detect the onset of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar episodes, in people with diabetes.
Identifying The 'Dimmer Switch' Of Diabetes
University of Alberta research gives new insight into what causes Type 2 diabetes.
10 to 1: Bugs Win in NASA study
Bugs are winning out, and that's a good thing according to NASA's Human Research Program.
MYC Oncogene Disrupts Cancers Rhythm
Findings inform time-dependent treatment for reducing side effects and increasing effectiveness of cancer medications.
Keeping Gut Bacteria in Balance Could Help Delay Age-related Diseases
A new study suggests that analyzing intestinal bacteria could be a promising way to predict health outcomes as we age.
Genome Mining Effort Discovers 19 New Natural Products in Four Years
Each of these products is a potential new drug. One of them has already been identified as an antibiotic.
New CRISPR-Cas9 Strategy Edits Genes Two Ways
A team of Harvard and MIT researchers have developed a way to perform genome engineering and gene regulation at the same time.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos