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Patrick Boisseau Elected Chairman of the ETPN

Published: Monday, March 25, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, March 25, 2013
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Program will focus on building a structure that speeds innovations’ time to market and patients, while keeping Europe’s nanomed IP at home.

CEA-Leti has announced that Patrick Boisseau, the head of Leti’s nanomedicine program, has been elected chairman of the European Technology Platform - Nanomedicine (ETPN), a joint initiative between industry, academia, clinicians and the European Commission to help build a profitable nanomedicine sector in Europe.

Nanomedicine development in Europe and globally has evolved from fundamental research in the first decade of this century to development of products, patents, clinical trials and regulatory approval.

Most of the innovation in Europe is occurring in research labs and small to midsize enterprises (SMEs), including start-ups that have spun off from universities and research institutes.

These SMEs typically conduct preclinical and early clinical proofs of concept with a goal of transferring the clinical development to large companies that have the financial resources and expertise to complete the costly and sometimes lengthy clinical trials and regulatory approval.

But optimism about nanomed’s potential impact on healthcare and for creating value and jobs has created intense global competition for nanomed IP and new technologies.

Boisseau said two of his primary goals during his two-year term as chairman of ETPN are keeping the nanomed innovation that is underway at many European facilities and SMEs in Europe and to help build a nanomedicine sector that can compete strongly with Asia and the U.S.

“One key way to do that is to organize a supply chain of SMEs to facilitate the transfer of innovation and technology to large companies and make these technologies available to patients as soon as possible,” he said.

Boisseau continued, “It also will require us to build key infrastructure in Europe, such as an EU nanotechnology characterization lab or a network of good manufacturing practices sites for medical nanomaterials. This initiative also will be a good opportunity for leading European institutes like KTH, EPFL, Helmholtz Fondation, Tecnalia, Fraunhofer, SINTEF and Leti to expand their nanomed partnerships with both SMEs and large companies.”

Boisseau has chaired the ETPN working group on nano diagnostics since the ETPN was formed in 2005.

“Nanomedicine, which is a key part of Leti’s focus on emerging healthcare technologies, holds tremendous potential to improve healthcare delivery for people all over the world,” said Leti CEO Laurent Malier.

Malier continued, “Leti’s focus on creating innovation in this field and transferring it to industry strongly supports the European Technology Platform - Nanomedicine’s mission, and Patrick Boisseau brings a practical and forward-looking perspective to his role as chairman of ETPN.”

In the same election, Dr. Laurent Levy, CEO of Nanobiotix, was elected vice chairman of ETPN. He represents SMEs on the platform’s executive board.

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