Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Pharma Outsourcing
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Nanosponges can Remove Toxins from Bloodstream

Published: Tuesday, April 16, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, April 16, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Engineers have invented a “nanosponge” capable of safely removing a broad class of dangerous toxins from the bloodstream.

These nanosponges, which thus far have been studied in mice, can neutralize “pore-forming toxins,” which destroy cells by poking holes in their cell membranes. Unlike other anti-toxin platforms that need to be custom synthesized for individual toxin type, the nanosponges can absorb different pore-forming toxins regardless of their molecular structures. In a study against alpha-haemolysin toxin from MRSA, pre-innoculation with nanosponges enabled 89 percent of mice to survive lethal doses. Administering nanosponges after the lethal dose led to 44 percent survival.

The team, led by nanoengineers at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, published the findings in Nature Nanotechnology April 14.

“This is a new way to remove toxins from the bloodstream,” said Liangfang Zhang, a nanoengineering professor at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and the senior author on the study. “Instead of creating specific treatments for individual toxins, we are developing a platform that can neutralize toxins caused by a wide range of pathogens, including MRSA and other antibiotic resistant bacteria,” said Zhang. The work could also lead to non-species-specific therapies for venomous snake bites and bee stings, which would make it more likely that health care providers or at-risk individuals will have life-saving treatments available when they need them most.

The researchers are aiming to translate this work into approved therapies. “One of the first applications we are aiming for would be an anti-virulence treatment for MRSA. That’s why we studied one of the most virulent toxins from MRSA in our experiments,” said “Jack” Che-Ming Hu, the first author on the paper. Hu, now a post-doctoral researcher in Zhang’s lab, earned his Ph.D. in bioengineering from UC San Diego in 2011.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Therapy Could Treat Breast Cancer that's Spread to Brain
Researchers have successfully combined cellular therapy and gene therapy in a mouse-model system to develop a viable treatment strategy for breast cancer that has spread to a patient's brain.
Tuesday, August 06, 2013
Deadliest Cancers May Respond to New Drug Treatment Strategy
Researchers have found a way to knock down cancers caused by a tumor-driving protein called “myc,” paving the way for clinical trials.
Monday, July 22, 2013
Simple Two-Drug Combination Proves Effective in Reducing Risk of Stroke
Phase 3 clinical trial in China, designed in partnership with UCSF, could change standard of care in U.S.
Thursday, June 27, 2013
FDA Names Breast Cancer Drug a Breakthrough Therapy
An experimental drug being investigated for the treatment of advanced breast cancer by researchers at UCLA this week received breakthrough therapy designation from the U.S. FDA.
Monday, April 15, 2013
Will Cell Therapy Become a 'Third Pillar' of Medicine?
Treating patients with cells may one day become as common as it is now to treat the sick with drugs made from engineered proteins, antibodies or smaller chemicals.
Thursday, April 04, 2013
Transplanted Neural Stem Cells Produced Myelin
A Phase I clinical trial led by investigators from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and sponsored by Stem Cells Inc., showed that neural stem cells successfully engrafted into the brains of patients and appear to have produced myelin.
Friday, October 12, 2012
Drug Combo more Effective for Breast Cancer Variant
Postmenopausal women with the most common type of metastatic breast cancer now have a new treatment option that lengthens their lives.
Friday, August 03, 2012
Computer Model Successfully Predicts Drug Side Effects
Research based on the similarity between a drugs chemical structures and those molecules known to cause side effects, according to a paper appearing online this week in the journal Nature.
Tuesday, June 12, 2012
Vision Loss in Eye Disease Slowed Using Novel Encapsulated Cell Therapy
Researchers found that long-term delivery of CNTF served to re-nourish the retina and stop or slow the loss of visual acuity caused by the disorder.
Wednesday, April 13, 2011
Scientific News
NIH Study Finds Calorie Restriction Lowers Some Risk Factors for Age-Related Diseases
Two-year trial did not produce expected metabolic changes, but influenced other life span markers.
Immunotherapy Agent Benefits Patients with Drug-Resistant Multiple Myeloma in First Human Trial
Daratumumab proved generally safe in patients, even at the highest doses.
NIH Study Shows No Benefit of Omega-3 Supplements for Cognitive Decline
Research was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NIH Launches Human RSV Study
Study aims to understand infection in healthy adults to aid development of RSV medicines, vaccines.
Computerized Flexible Needles Prove Themselves in Biological Tissue
The advantage of the system is that you can avoid obstacles with the needles or critical tissues and that the system during the insertion of the needle in real time can adjust the path if, for example, the tissue deforms.
DARWIN 2 24-week Monotherapy Data in RA Confirm Previous Results
Safety profile in DARWIN 2 consistent with previous filgotinib RA studies.
Researchers Publish Landmark “Basket Study”
Researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) have announced results from the first published basket study, a new form of clinical trial design that explores responses to drugs based on the specific mutations in patients’ tumors rather than where their cancer originated.
Agricultural Intervention Improves HIV Outcomes
A multifaceted farming intervention can reduce food insecurity while improving HIV outcomes in patients in Kenya, according to a randomized, controlled trial led by researchers at UC San Francisco.
Overdose of Vitamin D in Teenagers May Lead to Increased Cholesterol Levels
Dosing obese teens with vitamin D shows no benefits for their heart health or diabetes risk, and could have the unintended consequences of increasing cholesterol and fat-storing triglycerides. These are the latest findings in a series of Mayo Clinic studies in childhood obesity.
Phase 2 Trials Underway for New Single Dose Malaria Treatment
The new drug, which prevents the malaria parasite from reproducing and spreading, is now undergoing Phase II clinical trials in humans.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!