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Leading Japanese CRO Standardizes on Thermo Scientific Watson LIMS

Published: Wednesday, June 26, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, June 26, 2013
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JCL Bioassay uses Thermo Scientific Watson LIMS to optimize communication, data management and quality control during U.S. expansion.

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. announced that JCL Bioassay USA, Inc. has implemented Thermo Scientific Watson LIMS, the industry’s leading bioanalytical LIMS (laboratory information management system). JCL, one of the largest contract research organizations (CRO) in Japan specializing in preclinical and clinical bioanalysis, recently expanded its small and large molecule bioanalytical services to the U.S. and standardized on Watson LIMS across its laboratories to enhance reporting, improve efficiency and ensure data accuracy.

“Immediately following our decision to enter the U.S. market, we knew we needed a LIMS that combined proven industry-specific performance with flexibility,” said Jenny Lin, vice president of operations and CSO for JCL Bioassay USA. “By implementing Watson LIMS, it dramatically changes the landscape of lab operations. Not only does it provide an easy access for sample management, it also greatly enhances method validation, sample analysis and data management efficiency in our labs. With Watson LIMS, we know we can generate analytical data quicker and transfer the data to our sponsors securely. Watson LIMS ensures regulatory compliance and adds greater value to the high quality services we provide to our sponsors.”

Prior to implementing Watson LIMS, JCL had been using a manual, paper-based system to manage the data generated in its labs. Since CROs often operate under tight timetables to meet the requirements of their pharmaceutical sponsors, the delays caused by paper-based reporting forced researchers to stay late – even overnight – to submit results on time. Watson LIMS now enables the company to collect and analyze data more accurately and efficiently in labs across its distributed enterprise.

“We’re proud to be working with JCL, a company with a significant presence in the Japanese market and one which has made strategic moves to grow on a global basis,” said Kim Shah, director of marketing and new business development for the Informatics business at Thermo Fisher Scientific. “Watson LIMS has already made a positive impact on the company’s processes and data management, and as JCL’s business grows in the U.S., Watson will be able to adapt to the company’s constantly evolving needs.”

Thermo Scientific Watson LIMS is a leading bioanalytical laboratory information management system that is relied upon by 19 of the top 20 pharmaceutical companies and many leading CROs worldwide. It is designed to bring critical time and cost savings to pharmaceutical companies and CROs involved in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic (DMPK) studies for drug discovery and development by reducing validation time and improving overall efficiency. Standardizing on Thermo Scientific Watson LIMS, as JCL Bioassay has, ensures secure data transmissions, regulatory compliance, reliable audit trails and can improve time-to-market.

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