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  Events - April 2014


Peptides Congress 2014

03 Apr 2014 - 04 Apr 2014



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Over 400 attendees working within Proteins, Antibodies, Peptides and Biotherapeutics

Over 20 case studies, presentations and panel discussions

Co-Located with our 7th Annual Proteins Congress

14 pre-scheduled one to one meetings, exhibition and informal networking opportunities

Oxford Global Conferences are proud to present the Peptides Congress taking place on the 3rd & 4th April, 2014 at the Novotel London West, UK. Our esteemed experts will explore recent developments in peptide research from discovery and synthesis through to optimal engineering techniques and therapeutic applications.

The popularity of peptide therapeutics has increased significantly in recent years; the number of new peptides entering the clinic has doubled, and peptide therapies in the US have achieved sales over $1 billion. The Peptides Congress will bring together key decision makers and researchers in this revitalised field. On Day One, the Congress will examine various peptide discovery and synthesis techniques, whilst looking in detail at the design and production of peptide libraries and arrays, as well as synthesised and modified peptides. Our internationally renowned speakers will also give a detailed insight into protein-protein interactions and the production of bioactive peptides.

Due to their compelling potential, many major pharmaceuticals are seeing a resurgence of peptide use in their pipelines. The therapeutic potential of peptides is being embraced by the industry, and offers many novel opportunities for drug discovery. Day Two of the Congress will see discussions focus on peptide engineering, including peptidomimetics and peptide conjugation, as well as cell-penetrating peptides for molecular imaging. Additionally, our experts will discuss the potential of antimicrobial peptides in immunotherapy and as protease inhibitors in drug discovery.


The Peptides Congress is part of the highly successful Oxford Global Proteins Series.

Further information
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