Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

New Genomic Technique Uncovers Coral Transcriptome

Published: Tuesday, May 12, 2009
Last Updated: Tuesday, May 12, 2009
Bookmark and Share
Researchers have uncovered the larval transcriptome of a reef-building coral by utilizing a new technique for cDNA preparation.

Using a new technique for cDNA preparation combined with the latest sequencing methods, researchers have uncovered the larval transcriptome of a reef-building coral (Acropora millepora). Their study, described in the open access journal BMC Genomics, features the most extensive database of genes and genetic markers currently available for any coral.

A collaborative team of researchers from the University of Texas at Austin and Indiana University, led by Mikhail Matz and John Colbourne, developed a new method for transcriptome analysis based on next-generation 454 sequencing technology.

According to Eli Meyer, the primary author on the paper, “Our method specifically addresses problems that had hindered the sequencing of transcriptomes with 454, such as homopolymer (A/T) tracks, adaptor artifacts, and uneven transcript coverage”.

The new method requires as little as 1 microgram of total RNA, eliminates the need for a strand-selection step prior to emulsion PCR, and results in 2-5 fold greater 454 sequence output than in any previously reported attempts.  Meyer said, “These tools allow for the rapid development of sequence resources for any organism at a low cost – a few weeks and a few thousand dollars”.

The protocol outlined in the paper was developed for 454-FLX. The current version of the protocol (available from the authors' website) is already modified and tested to work with the latest ‘Titanium’ version of 454.

As well as demonstrating the technical power of the method, the study has identified approximately 11,000 genes on the basis of sequence similarity with known proteins, over 30,000 markers of genetic variation, and a number of novel candidate genes for stress-related processes.  The characterization of the larval transcriptome for this widely studied coral will enable research into the biological processes underlying stress responses in corals and their evolutionary adaptation to global climate change.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Can Cell Cycle Protein Prevent or Kill Breast Cancer Tumors?
An MD Anderson study has shown the potential of a simple molecule involved in cancer metabolism as a powerful therapeutic.
Monday, July 20, 2015
Unique Peptide Could Treat Cancers, Neurological Disorders, Infectious Diseases
Scientists have synthesized a peptide that shows potential for pharmaceutical development through an ability to induce a cell-recycling process called autophagy.
Monday, February 18, 2013
Metabolic Protein Launches Sugar Feast that Nurtures Brain Tumors
PKM2 slips into nucleus to promote cancer; potential biomarker and drug approach discovered.
Wednesday, November 28, 2012
Ancient Enzymes Function like Nanopistons to Unwind RNA
Molecular biologists have solved one of the mysteries of how double-stranded RNA is remodeled inside cells in both their normal and disease states.
Wednesday, September 05, 2012
Researchers Identify New, Cancer-Causing Role for Protein
Key to Akt activation is ubiquitination by a surprising culprit - TRAF6.
Tuesday, September 01, 2009
Protein Controls Aging by Controlling Insulin
The gene expresses a protein that works by repressing intracellular signals of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1, and may function as an anti-aging hormone in mammals.
Friday, September 16, 2005
Scientific News
Non-Disease Proteins Kill Brain Cells
Scientists at the forefront of cutting-edge research into neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s have shown that the mere presence of protein aggregates may be as important as their form and identity in inducing cell death in brain tissue.
Closing the Loop on an HIV Escape Mechanism
Research team finds that protein motions regulate virus infectivity.
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Gut Microbes Signal to the Brain When They're Full
Don't have room for dessert? The bacteria in your gut may be telling you something.
Turning up the Tap on Microbes Leads to Better Protein Patenting
Mining millions of proteins could become faster and easier with a new technique that may also transform the enzyme-catalyst industry, according to University of California, Davis, researchers.
Exploring the Causes of Cancer
Queen's research to understand the regulation of a cell surface protein involved in cancer.
Measuring microRNAs in Blood to Speed Cancer Detection
A simple, ultrasensitive microRNA sensor holds promise for the design of new diagnostic strategies and, potentially, for the prognosis and treatment of pancreatic and other cancers.
Novel Proteins Linked to Huntington's Disease
University of Florida Health researchers have made a new discovery about Huntington's disease, showing that the gene that causes the fatal disorder makes an unexpected "cocktail" of mutant proteins that accumulate in the brain.
Enzyme Critical to Maintaining Telomere Length Discovered
New method expected to speed understanding of short telomere diseases and cancer.
New Method Identifies Up to Twice as Many Proteins and Peptides
An international team of researchers developed a method that identifies up to twice as many proteins and peptides in mass spectrometry data than conventional approaches.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos