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NextBio Teams With Emory University for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

Published: Tuesday, September 25, 2012
Last Updated: Tuesday, September 25, 2012
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NextBio Clinical to be used for translational research focused on multiple myeloma.

Company has announced a partnership with Emory University and its Winship Cancer Institute using genomic data to identify unique biomarkers and treatments for patients with multiple myeloma. The centerpiece of the partnership is a translational research study that will use NextBio Clinical to interpret molecular data from patients with multiple myeloma, with the ultimate goal of making new discoveries that will improve the care of patients with refractory and relapsed forms of myeloma. These forms of myeloma, a plasma cell cancer that constitutes about 1% of all cancers in the United States, have been particularly challenging to treat.

"As a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated center, The Winship Cancer Institute is committed to using the latest technologies in conducting research studies," said Sagar Lonial, M.D., nationally recognized authority on myeloma research and Director of Translational Research for the B-Cell Malignancy Program at Winship and principal investigator for the study. "For this study, we will be collecting RNA-seq, SNP, and CNV data from our own patient samples. In addition, we plan to access the multiple myeloma cell line data available in the NextBio Platform as well as myeloma data from public repositories that NextBio has curated. Integrating use of molecular data alongside clinical data in our cancer translational research projects is a top priority, and this partnership will help us solidify that workflow."

"Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is world-renowned for their research work in multiple myeloma," said Alpana Verma-Alag, M.D., Head of Clinical Development at NextBio. "Through our work on this project we hope to positively impact the lives of those who suffer from this cancer. We also hope to take science a step forward by making it easy for researchers to integrate the use of genomic data in translational research."

The Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University is the only NCI-designated cancer center in Georgia, and one of only 59 NCI-designated centers providing cancer care in the country. Winship investigators conduct more than 150 therapeutic clinical trials and enrolled 700 patients in 2011. Winship has the largest unit in Georgia for phase I clinical trials, which are important to introducing new therapies against cancer.


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