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AssayMetrics and Cambridge Research Biochemicals Collaborate

Published: Monday, October 08, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, October 08, 2012
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Collaboration in the field of Fluorescence Lifetime technology.

AssayMetrics Ltd has announced collaboration with Cambridge Research Biochemicals Ltd, the UK’s most established peptide and antibody company.

Fluorescence Lifetime is a new and assay technology used in the biochemical screening of new drugs in High Throughput Screening and compound characterization roles in the pharmaceutical industry.

The collaboration involves Cambridge Research Biochemicals making key peptide substrates labelled with AssayMetrics’ Fluorescence Lifetime dyes.

The peptides are used to screen novel drugs in equipment such as AssayMetrics’ Fluospec® FL reader and are employed in assays involving kinases, proteases, protein:protein interactions and other target enzyme systems.

The collaboration brings together two companies leading their respective fields to be able to offer solutions to the pharmaceutical industry enabling faster, more efficient and cheaper drug discovery and development, thereby improving the effectiveness of pharmaceutical R&D.

Dr Pierre Graves, MD of AssayMetrics Ltd commented, “This is exciting news as Cambridge Research Biochemicals have considerable expertise in making the type of complex peptides needed for innovative discovery.”

Emily Humphrys, Commercial Director of Cambridge Research Biochemicals was equally positive: “This technology has so much potential that we are really pleased to be collaborating with AssayMetrics at this early stage.”

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