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MolecularHUB Gives Scientific Information on Fast-moving Diseases

Published: Thursday, October 25, 2012
Last Updated: Thursday, October 25, 2012
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A scientific gateway website that will provide molecular and genetic information on infectious and emerging diseases has been released by Purdue University.

The MolecularHUB site was announced Wednesday (Oct. 24) at the annual meeting of the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), which is being held in Long Beach, Calif.

James McGlothlin, a Purdue associate professor of health sciences and director of the site, said MolecularHUB will actively foster an environment of co-creation and collaboration. The goal of the site is to expand the current knowledge base of genetic markers, gene sequencing and molecular testing related to infectious diseases, chronic diseases and emerging diseases to help speed the identification and treatment of these diseases.

"With this site we have the opportunity to improve public health care and patient outcomes by providing free, easy access to the latest information," McGlothlin said. "The half-life of information in this field is very short; it's one of the fastest moving disciplines in modern science. So this site will keep professionals up-to-date with the latest scientific information."

The site, http://www.molecularHUB.org, is exclusively sponsored by BD (Becton Dickinson and Company), a Fortune 500 medical supply company.

"The goal is involve anyone working with molecular diagnostics so we can combine and leverage resources and capabilities," McGlothlin said. "This will allow us to standardize work practices and provide training and programs that will enhance scientific knowledge in this field."

Gregory Meehan, vice president for diagnostic systems and molecular diagnostics at BD Diagnostics, one of three divisions of BD, said the site has the potential to bring together medical and scientific communities.

"The valuable information and experiences of the global laboratory, scientific and academic community will come together through MolecularHUB in developing and sharing best practices across the spectrum of molecular-based diagnostic applications, laboratory efficiency, and clinical and economic outcomes," Meehan said.

The site is built on the Purdue-developed platform HUBzero, which has been used by more than 40 scientific, engineering and medical gateway sites as resources for scientific communities.

"MolecularHUB will be accessible to the more than 600,000 visitors of other hubs each year," McGlothlin said. "This will foster other opportunities for synergistic collaborations among disciplines such as engineering, laboratory design and ergonomics, and drug delivery."


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