Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Proteomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Bacteria Yield Clues About Why Proteins go Bad in ALS and Alzheimer’s

Published: Friday, November 02, 2012
Last Updated: Friday, November 02, 2012
Bookmark and Share
Scientists are unsure why proteins form improperly and cluster together in bunches, a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases.

“The question we are all asking is what happens when protein synthesis goes wrong?” said Jesse Rinehart, assistant professor of cellular and molecular physiology at Yale’s West Campus and co-senior author of the paper.

Proteins are created from instructions encoded in DNA and assembled in ribosomes within the cells. However, sometimes they are not assembled correctly, and these misfolded proteins tend to aggregate, a process typified by the plaques that form in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients.

The Yale team — led by Rinehart and Dieter Söll, Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry and professor of chemistry — showed that the antibiotic streptomycin can trigger protein aggregations in the bacterium E. coli. Using large-scale proteomics and genetic screens, they analyzed the aggregates and searched for bacterial proteins that make E. coli cells resistant to antibiotics and other threats. The researchers discovered how one of these proteins protecting the bacteria from hydrogen peroxide also suppressed the aggregation of proteins triggered by streptomycin.

“The properties of these protein aggregates are still mysterious, but here we have a glimpse of how they form and how cells escape from these aggregates in bacteria,” Söll said.

The study not only provides insight into how these protein aggregates can form, but illustrates how bacteria defend themselves against toxic threats. Such information could help scientists develop more effective antibiotics, Rinehart said.

Jiqiang Ling was the lead author of the paper. Other Yale authors included Chris Cho, Li-Tao Guo and Hans Aerni.

The work was funded by grants from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 4,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 5,300+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

‘NoBody,’ a Microprotein On a Mission
Researchers identify over 400 microproteins encoded in the human genome, one of which clears unneeded genetic material inside cells.
Tuesday, December 06, 2016
New Model for Studying Alzheimer’s Disease
Researchers develop new model for the study early-stage Alzheimer's, focusing on a particular protein.
Monday, November 21, 2016
Key Protein That Binds to LDL Cholesterol Identified
Researchers have identified a protein that is involved in the buildup of cholesterol in blood vessels.
Monday, November 21, 2016
Study Pinpoints Protein That Detects Radiation Damage
Researchers identify mechanism of radiation-induced tissue damage involving a particular protein
Monday, November 14, 2016
Study Finds Key Regulator in Pulmonary Fibrosis
Researchers identify an enzyme that could open the way to therpies for chronic fatal lung disease.
Thursday, October 20, 2016
Alzheimer’s-Linked Protein May Play Role in Schizophrenia
Researchers suggests a protein linked to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's also plays a role in genetic predisposition to schizophrenia.
Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Less is More in Ribosome Assembly
Research uncovers genetic "program" that allows for ribosome formation with a limited supply of magnesium.
Monday, October 17, 2016
New Way to Suppress Lung Tumours
Researchers uncover new blocking mechanism that inhibits cancer growth without blockading critical process.
Wednesday, October 05, 2016
New Type of Drug Can Target All Disease-causing Proteins
Current drugs block the actions of only about a quarter of known disease-causing proteins, but Yale University researchers have developed a technology capable of not just inhibiting, but destroying every protein it targets.
Monday, June 15, 2015
Single-Cell, 42-plexed Protein Analysis Achieved with a New Microchip Technology
A novel microdevice capable of detecting 42 unique immune effector proteins has been developed.
Tuesday, February 17, 2015
Tarantula Venom Holds Hope for New Painkillers
Screening more than 100 spider toxins, Yale researchers identified a protein from the venom of the Peruvian green velvet tarantula that blunts activity in pain-transmitting neurons.
Monday, February 17, 2014
Biomarkers Indicate Increased Risk of Death After Discharge from Cardiac Surgery
Following cardiac surgery, patients with elevated levels of kidney injury biomarkers are at a significantly higher risk of dying during the next three years, a Yale study has found.
Monday, December 23, 2013
Alzheimer’s Missing Link Found: Is a Promising Target for New Drugs
Researchers have discovered a protein that is the missing link in the complicated chain of events that lead to Alzheimer’s disease.
Monday, September 09, 2013
Lung Disease and Melanoma: a Common Molecular Mechanism?
Researchers have solved a biological mystery about the common genesis of many serious diseases such as asthma and metastatic melanoma.
Monday, September 02, 2013
Yale Nobel Laureate Honored with Connecticut Medal of Science
Thomas Steitz will receive the 2013 Connecticut (CT) Medal of Science, the state’s top prize for technological achievement crucial to economic development.
Monday, April 22, 2013
Scientific News
Protein-Based “Cancer Signature” Uncovered
Researchers investigated the expression of ribosomal proteins in human tissues and discovered a cancer type specific signature which could be used to predict the progression of the disease.
Predicting Leukaemia Development in Cancer Patients
Biomarker may predict which formerly treated cancer patients will develop highly fatal form of leukemia.
‘NoBody,’ a Microprotein On a Mission
Researchers identify over 400 microproteins encoded in the human genome, one of which clears unneeded genetic material inside cells.
Top 10 Life Science Innovations of 2016
2016 has seen the release of some truly innovative products. To help you digest these developments, The Scientist have listed their top picks for the year.
Largest Resource of Protein-Protein Interactions
Researchers have developed the largest ever database of protein-protein interactions.
Bright Red Fluorescent Protein Created
Scientists have created a bright red, fluorescent protein that could be used to track essential cellular processes.
Protein Self-Regulates Abundance
Researchers have uncovered how a protein, that plays a crucial role in embryonic stem cell renewal, is regulated.
'Lab on the Skin' for Sweat Analysis
Northwestern University researchers develop a low-cost wearable electronic device that collects and analyzes sweat for health monitoring.
Building Better Nanodiscs
Researchers have improved upon the design of nanodiscs that provide an unprecedented view of viral infection.
Breast Cancer Cells Starve for Cystine
Depriving triple negative breast cancer, a treatment-resistant form of breast cancer, of cystine results in cancer cell death.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
4,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,300+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!