Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Proteomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Reconsidering Cancer's Bad Guy

Published: Tuesday, November 20, 2012
Last Updated: Tuesday, November 20, 2012
Bookmark and Share
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have found that a protein, known for causing cancer cells to spread around the body, is also one of the molecules that trigger repair processes in the brain.

These findings are the subject of a paper, published this week in Nature Communications. They point the way to new avenues of research into degenerative brain diseases like Alzheimer’s.

How to repair brain injuries is a fundamental question facing brain researchers. Scientists have been familiar with the protein S100A4 for some time as a factor in metastasis, or how cancer spreads. However it’s the first time the protein has been shown to play a role in brain protection and repair.

“This protein is not normally in the brain, only when there’s trauma or degeneration. When we deleted the protein in mice we discovered that their brains were less protected and able to resist injury. We also discovered that S100A4 works by activating signalling pathways inside neurons,” says Postdoc Oksana Dmytriyeva, who worked on the research in a team at the Protein Laboratory in the Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology at the University of Copenhagen.

The villain turns out to be the hero

This research stands on the shoulders of many years of work on S100A4 in its deadlier role in cancer progression. The discovery represents a significant development for the new Neuro-Oncology Group that moved to the University of Copenhagen’s Protein Laboratory Group from the Danish Cancer Society in October.

“We were surprised to find this protein in this role, as we thought it was purely a cancer protein. We are very excited about it and we’re looking forward to continuing our research in a practical direction. We hope that the findings will eventually benefit people who need treatment for neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s disease, although obviously we have a long way to go before we get to that point,” says Oksana Dmytriyeva.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,400+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Discovery Accelerates Targeted Cancer Treatment
In collaboration with international scientists, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed a method to help shorten the road to better cancer treatment.
Monday, May 11, 2015
Protein Paves the Way for Correct Stem Cell Differentiation
Research from BRIC, University of Copenhagen, has identified a crucial role of the molecule Fbxl10 in differentiation of embryonic stem cells.
Monday, February 11, 2013
Grants Attract Top Researchers to Copenhagen
Two international leading researchers have each been awarded a Novo Nordisk Foundation Laureate Research Grant of DKK 40 million (€ 5.36 million).
Monday, January 28, 2013
Scientific News
Computational Model Finds New Protein-Protein Interactions
Researchers at University of Pittsburgh have discovered 500 new protein-protein interactions (PPIs) associated with genes linked to schizophrenia.
New Insights into Gene Regulation
Researchers have solved the three-dimensional structure of a gene repression complex that is known to play a role in cancer.
Controlling RNA in Living Cells
Modular, programmable proteins can be used to track or manipulate gene expression.
Soy Shows Promise as Natural Anti-Microbial Agent
Soy isoflavones and peptides may inhibit the growth of microbial pathogens that cause food-borne illnesses, according to a new study from University of Guelph researchers.
Potential Target for Revolutionary Antibiotics
An international team of including the Lomonosov Moscow State University researchers discovered which enzyme enables Escherichia coli bacterium (E. coli) to breathe.
DNA Barcodes Gone Wild
A team of researchers at University of Toronto’s Donnelly Centre and Sinai Health System’s Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute (LTRI) has developed a new technology that can stitch together DNA barcodes inside a cell to simultaneously search amongst millions of protein pairs for protein interactions.
Biomarkers for Profiling Prostate Cancer Patients
Exiqon A/S has announced the publication of validation of prognostic microRNA biomarkers for the aggressiveness of prostate cancer in independent cohorts.
Grant to Fund Million Peaks Project
The European Research Council (ERC) has awarded a prestigious Advanced Grant to Prof. Peter Schoenmakers, Prof. Albert Polman and Prof. Huib Bakker, all three of whom work at the University of Amsterdam (UvA).
Study Finds Factors That May Influence Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness
Researchers at NIH have suggested that the long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited.
Enzyme Structure May Aid Antibiotic Development
Targeted enzyme is essential to every known strain of bacteria.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,400+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!