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Randox announces CE Marking of its Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Multiplex Array

Published: Wednesday, November 28, 2012
Last Updated: Wednesday, November 28, 2012
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Randox is pleased to announce the CE marking of the STI Multiplex Array, recognising its use as a powerful diagnostic weapon in the battle to control sexually transmitted infections.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are on the increase worldwide and present a major challenge to world public health.  This rise in STI cases shows that current measures, including existing technologies and screening programmes cannot cope with clinical need. STIs are of significant medical, social and economic importance affecting up to 25-30% of young adults, with the developing world having a disproportionate burden of disease. STIs can be difficult to diagnose because of atypical or asymptomatic presentation and left untreated can result in serious health problems including infertility or complications during pregnancy.  Those with untreated STIs can also act as reservoirs for future infection.

To avoid preventable health complications and to encourage more responsible sexual health practices, Randox has developed the STI Multiplex Array that can simultaneously detect 10 of the most prevalent STIs from a single urine or swab sample, in a single test within 5 hours. These STIs include Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoea, Trichomonas vaginalis, Treponema pallidum (syphilis), Herpes simplex 1 & 2, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Haemophilus ducreyi.


In addition to providing the most comprehensive STI screen available, testing for multiple STI pathogens can identify secondary infections, which are present in greater numbers than previously thought, and allow specific treatments for all infections diagnosed.  The accuracy and comprehensive diagnostic ability of the Randox STI Multiplex Array compensates for many of the current diagnosing limitations and has the potential to revolutionise STI diagnosis. This will improve patient outcome and reduce the social and economical burden of such pathogens. Using this test has added benefits through more appropriate use of antibiotics, which will reduce the potential for antibiotic resistance.

The CE marking of the STI Multiplex Array signifies that this groundbreaking test is suitable for the accurate diagnosis of STIs in a clinical setting and provides further evidence that Randox continues to develop innovative diagnostic solutions to meet the increasing demands of healthcare providers worldwide.

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