Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Protein Linked to Atopic Dermatitis

Published: Friday, January 25, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, January 24, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Dr. Indra’s team to explore the role of Ctip2 in the skin of adult mice.

A study in mice suggests that lack of a certain protein may trigger atopic dermatitis, the most common type of eczema. The finding may lead to improved treatment options for people.

Atopic dermatitis is a chronic disease in which the skin becomes itchy and inflamed. The disease can be difficult to treat. It affects an estimated 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults nationwide.

Most people outgrow atopic dermatitis by early adulthood, but for some, the disease persists. Both genes and environmental factors play a role in atopic dermatitis, but its root causes aren’t known.

Scientists believe that atopic dermatitis involves a defective skin barrier that allows allergens to enter the skin and interact with immune cells to cause inflammation. Several proteins have been identified that may be involved in this response.

One is thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), which has also been linked to asthma and to a food allergy-related disorder called eosinophilic esophagitis.

TSLP expression is elevated in mice with atopic dermatitis. The factors involved in this regulation, however, aren’t well understood.

Past work led by Dr. Arup Indra at Oregon State University showed that COUP-TF interacting protein 2 (Ctip2) is crucial for forming and maintaining the skin barrier in developing mouse embryos. Ctip2 was also found to be important for skin lipid metabolism, which keeps the skin healthy and hydrated.

In the new study, Indra's team set out to explore the role of Ctip2 in the skin of adult mice. The team genetically altered mice to remove Ctip2 from epidermal (outer layer) skin cells.

The study was partly funded by NIH's National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). Results appeared in the December 20, 2012, issue of the online journal PLoS One.

The researchers found that around 8 to 10 weeks after birth, 67% of the mice lacking Ctip2 had dry and scaly skin and 17% also developed skin lesions. By 4 months, 89% of the altered mice displayed symptoms. Normal mice didn’t have skin issues at any age.

The team identified an age-dependent increase in certain inflammatory cells in the skin of the mice lacking Ctip2. Ctip2 deficiency also caused systemic inflammatory responses.

The altered mice had enlarged lymph nodes and spleens, as well as high levels of circulating inflammatory proteins.

Expression of genes known to be involved in mouse and human atopic dermatitis, including TSLP, increased in mouse skin when Ctip2 was absent.

TSLP levels were up to 1,000-fold higher. The team found evidence that Ctip2 directly regulates TSLP. Future research will be needed to determine precisely how repression of TSLP by Ctip2 might protect against disease.

“With a better understanding of just what is causing eczema on a genetic basis, we should be able to personalize treatments, determine exactly what each person needs, and develop new therapies,” Indra says. “This might be with topical compounds that increase Ctip2 expression in skin cells, or customized treatments to restore an individual person’s lipid profile.”

Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 5,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

NIH Study Determines Key Differences between Allergic and Non-Allergic Dust Mite Proteins
Researchers at NIH have uncovered factors that lead to the development of dust mite allergy and assist in the design of better allergy therapies.
Thursday, October 20, 2016
Detecting Bacterial Infections in Newborns
Researchers tested an alternative way to diagnose bacterial infections in infants—by analyzing RNA biosignatures from a small blood sample.
Wednesday, September 14, 2016
$12.4M Awarded to Neural Regeneration Projects
The National Institutes of Health will fund six projects to identify biological factors that influence neural regeneration.
Friday, September 02, 2016
Oxygen Can Impair Cancer Immunotherapy
Researchers have identified a mechanism within the lungs where anticancer immune resposnse is inhibited.
Friday, August 26, 2016
New Inflammatory Disease Discovered
NIH researchers have discovered a rare and potentially deadly disease - otulipenia - the mostly affects children.
Tuesday, August 23, 2016
How Parkinson’s Disease Alters Brain Activity Over Time
The NIH study provides a new tool for testing experimental medications aimed at alleviating symptoms and slowing the rate at which the diseases damage the brain.
Tuesday, August 16, 2016
Genetic Cause of Rare Pediatric Neuropathy Identified
NIH mouse study identifies the mechanism responsible for a rare form of pediatric neuropathy.
Thursday, August 04, 2016
Uncovering Rhinovirus C Structure
Researchers have determined the structure of rhinovirus C. Their findings may aid the development of antiviral therapies and vaccines.
Wednesday, July 27, 2016
Advancing Protein Visualization
Cryo-EM methods can determine structures of small proteins bound to potential drug candidates.
Friday, May 27, 2016
Study Finds Factors That May Influence Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness
Researchers at NIH have suggested that the long-held approach to predicting seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness may need to be revisited.
Wednesday, April 20, 2016
Visualizing a Cancer Drug Target at Atomic Resolution
Using cryo-electron microscopy, researchers were able to view, in atomic detail, the binding of a potential small molecule drug to a key protein in cancer cells.
Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Genomic Signature Shared by Five Types of Cancer
National Institutes of Health researchers have identified a striking signature in tumor DNA that occurs in five different types of cancer.
Monday, February 08, 2016
Natural Protein Points to New Inflammation Treatment
Findings may offer insight to effective treatments for inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and multiple sclerosis.
Friday, February 05, 2016
Biomarkers Outperform Symptoms in Parsing Psychosis Subgroups
Multiple biological pathways lead to similar symptoms - NIH-funded study.
Thursday, December 10, 2015
NIH Supports New Studies to Find Alzheimer’s Biomarkers in Down Syndrome
Initiative will track dementia onset, progress in Down syndrome volunteers.
Tuesday, December 01, 2015
Scientific News
Integrated Omics Analysis
Studying multi-omics promises to give a more holistic picture of the organism and its place in its ecosystem, however despite the complexities involved those within the field are optimistic.
RNA-Binding Proteins Role in ALS Revealed
Researchers describe how damage to RNA-binding protein contributes to ALS, isolating a possible therapeutic target.
Advances in Alzheimer’s Research
Researchers show how a diseased vertebrate brain can naturally react to Alzheimer’s pathology by forming more neurons.
Study Finds Key Regulator in Pulmonary Fibrosis
Researchers identify an enzyme that could open the way to therpies for chronic fatal lung disease.
NIH Study Determines Key Differences between Allergic and Non-Allergic Dust Mite Proteins
Researchers at NIH have uncovered factors that lead to the development of dust mite allergy and assist in the design of better allergy therapies.
Alzheimer’s-Linked Protein May Play Role in Schizophrenia
Researchers suggests a protein linked to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's also plays a role in genetic predisposition to schizophrenia.
Peptides vs. Superbugs
Scientists successfully develop a shuttle system made of liquid-crystalline nanomaterials that protect peptites.
Immune Approach Targets Humans Instead of Bacteria
Scientists show for the first time how bacterial superantigen toxins work, and how short peptides can block them and save lives.
Cocoa Compound Linked to Some Cardiovascular Biomarker Improvements
The study highlights the urgent need for large, long-term RCTs that improve understanding of how the short-term benefits of cocoa flavanol intake on cardiometabolic biomarkers may be translated into clinical outcomes.
Could 2D Mass Spec Breakthrough Lead to Medical Revolution?
Pharmaceutical research could be quicker and more precise, thanks to an innovative breakthrough in 2D mass spec from the University of Warwick.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,200+ scientific videos