Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Proteomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Biomarker Discovery Center Receives Grant to Develop Diagnostic Blood Test

Published: Thursday, January 31, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, January 31, 2013
Bookmark and Share
The $799,800 grant from the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation to develop is for a blood test that can diagnose mild cognitive impairment (MCI) caused by early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

MCI affects nearly one in every five adults older than 65, causing memory and language problems beyond those associated with normal aging. Individuals with MCI often exhibit early symptoms of dementia, and approximately 60 percent of all MCI cases are believed to be early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.

The grant from the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation will help expand earlier research conducted by Robert Nagele, PhD, the director of the Biomarker Discovery Center. Dr. Nagele’s published research includes recent findings that identify specific autoantibody biomarkers in the blood that can potentially be used to diagnose early stages of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

“Using our novel biomarker discovery strategy, we have shown that it is possible to use a single drop of blood to diagnose Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s with greater than 95 percent accuracy,” said Nagele. “This same approach should also allow us to identify a small number of biomarkers that can also accurately diagnose MCI caused by early-stage Alzheimer’s disease.”

The funded project will pursue three specific goals: identify a small number of autoantibody biomarkers that can accurately (90 percent or higher) diagnose MCI cases caused by early stage Alzheimer’s disease; verify the accuracy rate with a larger scale study; and construct and test a diagnostic kit that is maximally accurate for the broadest possible MCI patient population. If successful, the study will then take the steps needed for final Food and Drug Administration approval of the test.

Current approaches to MCI diagnosis rely on physical, neurological and psychiatric examinations, laboratory tests, and a thorough review of the patient’s medications and medical history. Recently, great attention has been given to using neuroimaging technologies to detect structural changes in the brain before symptoms appear. However, these approaches require expensive equipment and technology and can require hospital visits, the injection of radioactive compounds and the availability of radiologists with advanced training in these techniques.

“A relatively non-invasive test such as ours would allow for early detection of Alzheimer’s-driven MCI, which could lead to beneficial lifestyle changes and improved quality of life, and allow for patients and their families to plan for the future,” Nagele said. “It will also enable physicians to distinguish Alzheimer’s-driven MCI from that caused by other treatable conditions, such as drug reactions, depression or changes to the brain’s supply of blood or oxygen.”

While current treatments for Alzheimer’s cannot stop the progression of the disease, several medications are capable of significantly enhancing brain performance and alleviating symptoms. A number of promising drugs are also currently under development and in clinical trials for the treatment of early Alzheimer’s disease. An easy-to-administer blood test for MCI would give pharmaceutical companies a way to identify patients for clinical trials who are at a very early stage of their disease and give researchers a nearly immediate way to monitor the effectiveness of medications under examination.

The UMDNJ-School of Osteopathic Medicine, the New Jersey Health Foundation, and Durin Technologies, Inc., a biotechnology company with expertise in protein microarray technology, will provide additional support and in-kind contributions of staff, equipment and supplies directly related to this study.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Sorting Through Cellular Statistics
Aaron Dinner, professor in chemistry, and his graduate student Herman Gudjonson are trying to read the manual of life, DNA, as part of the Dinner group’s research into bioinformatics—the application of statistics to biological research.
First Artificial Ribosome Designed
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University have engineered a tethered ribosome that works nearly as well as the authentic cellular component, or organelle, that produces all the proteins and enzymes within the cell.
The Genetic Roots of Adolescent Scoliosis
Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences in collaboration with Keio University in Japan have discovered a gene that is linked to susceptibility of Scoliosis.
HIV Susceptibility Linked to Little-Understood Immune Cell Class
High levels of diversity among immune cells called natural killer cells may strongly predispose people to infection by HIV, and may be driven by prior viral exposures, according to a new study.
New Tech Enables Epigenomic Analysis with a Mere 100 Cells
A new technology that will dramatically enhance investigations of epigenomes, the machinery that turns on and off genes and a very prominent field of study in diseases such as stem cell differentiation, inflammation and cancer has been developed by researchers at Virginia Tech.
TOPLESS Plants Provide Clues to Human Molecular Interactions
Scientists at Van Andel Research Institute have revealed an important molecular mechanism in plants that has significant similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans, which are closely linked to early embryonic development and to diseases such as cancer.
Toxin from Salmonid Fish has Potential to Treat Cancer
Researchers from the University of Freiburg decode molecular mechanism of fish pathogen.
Study Finds Non-Genetic Cancer Mechanism
Cancer can be caused solely by protein imbalances within cells, a study of ovarian cancer has found.
Long-sought Discovery Fills in Missing Details of Cell 'Switchboard'
A biomedical breakthrough reveals never-before-seen details of the human body’s cellular switchboard that regulates sensory and hormonal responses.
Rice Disease-Resistance Discovery Closes the Loop for Scientific Integrity
Researchers reveal how disease resistant rice detects and responds to bacterial infections.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!