Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Proteomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Avacta Analytical’s Optim® 1000 Micro-volume Protein Analysis Instrument

Published: Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Faster characterization of enzymes with Avacta’s Optim® 1000.

The DSM is taking advantage of Avacta Analytical’s Optim® (http://www.avactaanalytical.com/optim-2) 1000 micro-volume protein analysis instrument to characterize enzymes for use in the food industry.

Mark Stor, an associate scientist in the applied biochemistry department, explained: “Enzymes are sold on an activity basis, and that requires biochemical characterization to establish what the enzyme looks like and how it behaves. We need to know the limitations of each enzyme to determine which applications it is most suitable for.”

“We saw the Optim at some laboratory fairs, and were interested in its ability to run temperature gradients and produce stability profiles. This is really important for us; stability is always an issue with enzymes. If an enzyme is produced at 30 °C, will it also work at 60 °C? We have to test the enzyme to establish its limits, looking at its activity at different temperatures and in a range of formulations. To do this manually is extremely time consuming, but using the Optim it is possible to study 96 formulations in a day, obtaining a complete temperature profile that gives an indication of the most stable products. It is much quicker, and reduces the amount of work required. We can screen samples more quickly and, in the future, may even be able to replace lengthy shelf life studies.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,900+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Avacta Sign Third Distribution Agreement with Pall Life Sciences
Deal marks Avacta’s entry to the third largest Asia-Pacific biotech market.
Friday, September 28, 2012
Avacta Analytical Partners with UCL
Avacta Analytical is partnering with University College London (UCL) as an industrial sponsor of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Emergent Macromolecular Therapies.
Friday, November 18, 2011
Scientific News
Liquid Biopsies: Miracle Diagnostic or Next New Fad?
Thanks to the development of highly specific gene-amplification and sequencing technologies liquid biopsies access more biomarkers relevant to more cancers than ever before.
Uncovering Rhinovirus C Structure
Researchers have determined the structure of rhinovirus C. Their findings may aid the development of antiviral therapies and vaccines.
New Centre Offers Ultra-Speed Protein Analysis
UW-Madison researchers to establish development centre for next-gen protein measurement technologies.
Protein Nanocages Could Improve Drug Design and Delivery
HHMI scientists have designed and built 10 large protein icosahedra that are similar to viral capsids that carry viral DNA.
Virus Inspired Cell Cargo Ships
Virus-inspired container design may lead to cell cargo ships following construction of ten large, two-component, icosahedral protein complexes.
Protein Reinforces Growth of Damaged Muscles
Biologists have found a protein involved in stem cells that bolsters damaged muscle tissue growth - potential for muscle degeneration treatments.
Structure of Cold Virus Solved
Researchers have identified the structure of an elusive cold virus linked to child asthma and respiratory infections, providing the foundation for treating the virus.
New Protein Model Could Accelerate Drug Development
Stony Brook-led international research team creates ultra-fast approach to model protein interactions.
Researchers Can Control Genes Involved in Cancer
A new way to control the activity of a protein, that is often upregulated in cancer, has been discovered by Moffitt researchers through monoubiquitination mechanism.
Mitochondrial Role in Metastatic Cancer
Researchers have manipulated proteins, sourced from tumour cells, that are essential for maintaining tumour cells and in doing so, have significantly reduced the ability of cancer cells.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,900+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!