Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Dezima In-Licenses CETP Inhibitor Program from MTPC

Published: Thursday, April 25, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, April 25, 2013
Bookmark and Share
World-renowned dyslipidemia experts join Dezima’s Scientific Advisory Board.

Dezima Pharma (‘Dezima’) has announced the in-licensing of a cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor DEZ-001 (formerly TA-8995) from Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation (MTPC). Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

DEZ-001 has completed single and multiple ascending dose studies showing an unprecedented effect on high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels in healthy volunteers with a very favourable side-effect profile.

The company plans to support clinical development of DEZ-001 to Phase 3 clinical trials.

Professor John Kastelein, founder of Dezima, co-founder of UniQure and advisor to Forbion Capital Partners, identified DEZ-001 as a potentially best-in-class, potent and safe CETP inhibitor.

At the same time, Dezima also reported the strengthening of its Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) with the addition of two world-leading experts in the dyslipidemia space: Dr Philip Barter, President of the International Atherosclerosis Society and Conjoint Professor at The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, and Dr Bryan Brewer, Director at Washington Cardiovascular Associates and Senior Research Consultant of Lipoprotein and Atherosclerosis Research at the Medstar Research Institute, Washington DC, USA.

Professor Kastelein, Dezima’s CSO and Chairman of its SAB, commented: “CETP inhibitors hold enormous potential to further normalize lipid levels in millions of dyslipidemic patients worldwide. This product was a compelling in-licensing prospect because of its promising early clinical efficacy and safety profile. By applying a smart development program, DEZ-001 could potentially enter the market at a time similar to competing CETP inhibitors.”

Sander van Deventer, Dezima’s interim-CEO and General Partner at Forbion Capital Partners, who seed-financed Dezima together with BioGeneration Ventures, added: “The dyslipidemia space represents an attractive investment opportunity due to the continued high unmet medical need and the introduction of several next-generation therapeutic approaches. The addition of these two renowned experts to Dezima’s SAB will support the company in advancing DEZ-001, and in helping to identify additional earlier-stage dyslipidemia assets in order to develop a range of promising therapies in the CVD field.”

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,700+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Dezima Initiates Phase 2b TULIP Study on CETP Inhibitor Program DEZ-001
TULIP study will investigate the effects of different doses of DEZ-001 on CVD biomarkers.
Friday, August 30, 2013
Scientific News
Analyzing Protein Structures in Their Native Environment
Enhanced-sensitivity NMR could reveal new clues to how proteins fold.
Biomarker Predicting Transplant Complications May be Key to Treating Them
A protein that can be used to predict if a stem cell transplant patient will suffer severe complications may also be the key to preventing those complications, an international research team based at the Indiana University School of Medicine reported Wednesday.
New Protein Cleanup Factors Found to Control Bacterial Growth
UMass Amherst researchers characterize previously mysterious proteolysis factors.
Proteins with ALS, Cancer Role Do Not Assume a Regular Shape
Our cells contain proteins, essential to functions like protein creation and DNA repair but also involved in forms of ALS and cancer, that never take a characteristic shape, a new study shows.
Key to Natural Detoxifier’s Reactivity Discovered
Results have implications for health, drug design and chemical synthesis.
New Protein Found in Immune Cells
Immunobiologists from the University of Freiburg discover Kidins220/ARMS in B cells and demonstrate its functions.
Cell's Waste Disposal System Regulates Body Clock Proteins
New way to identify interacting proteins could identify potential drug targets.
How a Molecular Motor Untangles Protein
Diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases, all involve “tangled” proteins.
Compound Doubles Up On Cancer Detection
Researchers have found that tagging a pair of markers found almost exclusively on a common brain cancer yields a cancer signal that is both more obvious and more specific to cancer.
How Cell Growth Triggers Cell Division
Researchers in Jan Skotheim's lab have discovered a previously unknown mechanism that controls how large cells grow, an insight that could one day provide insight into attacking diseases such as cancer.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,700+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos