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Molecular Devices Becomes Global Distributor of IonFlux

Published: Tuesday, May 28, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, May 28, 2013
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Molecular Devices makes deal with Fluxion Biosciences to distribute their automated electrophysiology systems and associated products.

Molecular Devices® announced it has made an agreement with Fluxion Biosciences to become global distributor for the IonFlux™ portfolio of instrumentation and consumables. Molecular Devices will also provide support for all IonFlux Systems users through its recently expanded team of Application Specialists.

The IonFlux Systems offer an unrivalled level of simplicity for electrophysiology. Combined with low running costs, this makes the systems an ideal solution for laboratories in both academic and industrial settings. The IonFlux 16 Electrophysiology System is capable of delivering results from up to 64 test compounds per run, while the IonFlux HT Platform can deliver results from up to 256 test compounds per run.

Jeff Jensen, CEO of Fluxion, commented: “Molecular Devices’ long history in the electrophysiology field, combined with the expertise of its applications support team, means that they are ideally placed to support scientists working with IonFlux Systems. We are delighted that they will be taking responsibility for distributing the line worldwide.”

Kevin Chance, President of Molecular Devices, said: “The IonFlux Systems are an excellent complement to our existing line of electrophysiology products, which includes IonWorks Barracuda® and IonWorks Quattro™ Automated Systems with Population Patch Clamp™ Technology, PatchXpress® 7000A and the Axon® line of Conventional Electrophysiology Systems. The simplicity of the IonFlux Systems enables a broad range of scientists to access electrophysiology and ion channel research, making them a great addition to the Molecular Devices offering.

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