Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Proteomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

High Levels of RANK Protein Interferes with the Differentiation of Mammary Cells

Published: Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Levels of this protein increase with age, which could explain the increase in breast cancer risk associated with age.

Researchers of the Transformation and Metastasis research group at Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Eva González-Suárez, have shown that overexpression of RANK signalling pathway interferes with the differentiation of the cells that form the mammary glands. This produces an accumulation of undifferentiated cells that finally leads to tumor development.

In previous studies, the laboratory of Eva Gonzalez-Suarez had already demonstrated that over activation of RANK signalling pathway promotes the initiation, progression and metastasis of tumors in breast epithelial cells.

In this article, published in the journal Stem Cells, researchers have extensively studied the role of RANK in the differentiation of breast cells from a transgenic mouse model that presents an over activaton of this pathway.

Mammary cell lineages

In a non-transgenic mouse, with normal levels of RANK, the cells of the ducts (tubes where circulates milk in the mammary glands) are differentiated into two lineages: the luminal cells that are oriented to the lumen of the duct and basal cells of lining.

"The two cell populations are well separated and tidy" explained Eva González-Suárez "but in genetically modified animals with high levels of expression of RANK was observed several abnormalities affecting the morphology: ducts are disorganized, do not form continuous layers of cells and they are not oriented as they should. "

Using various techniques, researchers have demonstrated that mice with overactivation of RANK pathway accumulate breast stem cells that have not differentiated cells with basal and luminal characteristics, ie intermediate progenitor cells that have not performed the differentiation process. "This accumulation" said Gonzalez-Suarez, "leads to the development of heterogeneous tumors."

The study also shows that in the unmodified mice as they age and after many pregnancies, naturally levels of RANK increase, which could explain that with age increases the risk of breast cancer.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,900+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 5,300+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

A Gene Conserved from Worms to Humans Opens the Door to new Therapeutics
Gene shows promising therapeutic strategies in cancer and in some types of blindness.
Friday, June 21, 2013
Identified a Key Protein in Maintaining the Identity of B Lymphocytes
This finding could be useful for the study of blood diseases such as lymphoma and leukemia.
Monday, June 10, 2013
Ángel Carracedo: ''Only 50% of First-Line Drugs are Effective''
The Professor of Legal Medicine and director of the Genomic Medicine lab at the University of Santiago de Compostela, talked of the future challenges of the field of pharmacogenetics in the clinic.
Wednesday, March 20, 2013
Scientific News
Top 10 Life Science Innovations of 2016
2016 has seen the release of some truly innovative products. To help you digest these developments, The Scientist have listed their top picks for the year.
Largest Resource of Protein-Protein Interactions
Researchers have developed the largest ever database of protein-protein interactions.
Bright Red Fluorescent Protein Created
Scientists have created a bright red, fluorescent protein that could be used to track essential cellular processes.
Protein Self-Regulates Abundance
Researchers have uncovered how a protein, that plays a crucial role in embryonic stem cell renewal, is regulated.
'Lab on the Skin' for Sweat Analysis
Northwestern University researchers develop a low-cost wearable electronic device that collects and analyzes sweat for health monitoring.
Building Better Nanodiscs
Researchers have improved upon the design of nanodiscs that provide an unprecedented view of viral infection.
Breast Cancer Cells Starve for Cystine
Depriving triple negative breast cancer, a treatment-resistant form of breast cancer, of cystine results in cancer cell death.
Novel Urine Test to Predict High-Risk Cervical Cancer
Preliminary studies affirm accuracy and potential cost savings to screen for virus-caused malignancy.
Protein-Folding Gene Helps Heal Wounds
Researchers identified a protein that dramatically accelerates wound healing in animal models.
Crop Yield Gets Boost with Modified Genes
Researchers increase plant proteins that result in more efficient use of sunlight.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,900+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,300+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!