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PhyNexus Announces the Launch of the Enhanced MEA 2 Personal Purification System

Published: Friday, November 08, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, November 08, 2013
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PhyNexus Inc. launches of its next generation platform for automated chromatography applications.

The MEA 2 is designed to process PhyTip® columns for automated and unattended purification and enrichment of soluble and membrane proteins and plasmid DNA.

PhyNexus.gifThe MEA 2 features a redesigned 12-channel head pipette system. This incorporates improved performance and reliability, even with viscous liquids and is suitable for cold room usage.

The back and forth active transport in the PhyTip chromatography column drives binding and elution to equilibrium maximising yield and concentration. The system is capable of processing samples sizes from 100 µL up to 80mL allowing great flexibility in a personal robotic platform. In addition to excellent purification, the ability to perform elutions in volumes as low as 10 µL provides excellent sample concentration.

Application areas that benefit from the features of the enhanced MEA 2 include process development, parallel large volume purification and crystallography sample preparation.

 “We are finding that the popularity of our MEA robotic systems is increasing rapidly” says PhyNexus CEO, Douglas Gjerde, Ph.D. “Historically, our MEA line has filled an important niche for our customers.  Unlike larger systems our robotic system sits on any bench top and is easy to program by our research customers who are actually using the system while still providing the automation and throughput that our customer need.  We are pleased with the early success of this new MEA 2 offering.”

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