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NEW G:BOX Chemi XRQ Image Analysis System from Syngene

Published: Thursday, January 16, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, January 16, 2014
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Affordable, High Performance Multi-application Imaging.

Scientific Digital Imaging’s Syngene Division is delighted to announce the new G:BOX Chemi XRQ multi-functional image analysis system is now available. Utilising the latest imaging technology and software, the G:BOX Chemi XRQ system is ideal for scientists needing a cost-efficient system for quickly and easily imaging a range of gel or blot types.


The G:BOX Chemi XRQ features a new generation, high resolution, high quantum efficiency (a massive 73% quantum efficiency at 425nm) and low noise CCD camera with 4 megapixel imaging capabilities inside a light tight darkroom. This means the G:BOX Chemi XRQ can accurately visualise and separate faint and bright bands on one gel or blot with ease.


The cleverly designed modular system includes motor-driven lenses and filter wheel with the option of including red, blue, green, IR LEDs and transillumination lighting, making G:BOX Chemi XRQ the versatile choice for chemiluminescent Westerns, as well as standard fluorescence and colorimetric imaging tasks.


The G:BOX Chemi XRQ, which can be supplied with a computer or researchers can use their own laboratory computer, is controlled by touch screen via new streamlined GeneSys software. This guides scientists through image set-up using its database of imaging conditions for hundreds of commercially available dyes, thus saving researchers the time and effort of looking up recommended detection conditions.


GeneSys rapidly optimises filters and lighting according to the hardware inside the G:BOX Chemi XRQ and the image is calibrated according to the gel or blot’s size allowing scientists to take advantage of the camera’s full resolving power. Researchers then select their combination and the software instructs the G:BOX  Chemi XRQ to automatically set-up the filters and lighting to generate sharp, clear gel or blot images. For even faster, automated image capture, GeneSys includes a unique researcher ‘protocol save’ feature enabling one-click recall of frequently used imaging settings.

Laura Sullivan, Syngene’s Divisional Manager stated: “In these budget constrained times, scientists’ feedback is that they need an image analyser which is versatile enough to be used by a large number of researchers of different skill levels so has to be easy to set up, allow storage of specific image protocols and perform well with a range of different dyes on gels and blots.”

Laura continued: “This is challenging but utilising our years of expertise, we have combined a camera, which has the highest quantum efficiency of any in this imager class, with incredible new GeneSys image capture software to develop the G:BOX Chemi XRQ. The result is that researchers looking for an affordable image analysis system that rapidly delivers high quality, chemiluminescence blot, fluorescence and colorimetric gel images time after time won’t want any other system, when they see a G:BOX Chemi XRQ in action.”


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