Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Horizon Signs Large-Scale License Agreement for its X-MAN Cell Lines in Japan

Published: Thursday, January 30, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, January 30, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Agreement covers use of 250 of Horizon’s X-MAN genetically defined isogenic cell lines.

Horizon Discovery™ announce that it has entered into a large-scale licensing agreement with a Japanese medical university. The agreement covers a limited use label license for academic use of 250 of Horizon’s X-MAN™ genetically defined, isogenic cell lines, and demonstrates the global recognition of the company’s in vitro disease models.

Horizon’s X-MAN isogenic cell lines accurately model the disease-causing mutations found in patients with cancer, and increasingly other diseases. Horizon creates these cell lines using its precision genome-editing GENESIS™ platform, consisting of rAAV, ZFN and CRISPR technologies, to engineer specific disease-related mutations. These models help researchers understand how complex genetic diseases manifest themselves in patients, and can reduce the cost of bringing to market new personalized therapies by streamlining many aspects of drug development including target identification, target validation, assay development, drug screening, lead optimization, and biomarker-driven clinical trial design.

Kam Dhaliwal, VP Sales, Horizon Discovery, commented: “This is a very significant deal for Horizon Discovery, covering a large number of cell lines and representing a large investment by the university. We are delighted that our distribution partnership in Japan with Summit Pharmaceuticals International (SPI) is proving so productive.  Summit has proven to be extremely effective in opening the Japanese market for Horizon and we anticipate further adoption of our products and services in Japan in the future.”

The director of the Translational Research Centre at the university commented: “Horizon’s X-MAN cell lines offer a unique and valuable resource for the study of specific, disease-related mutations. We are look forward to applying the X-MAN technology in our research projects.”

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Horizon In-licenses Oncology Programme from Servier
License programme with milestone payments of up to £50 million plus royalties on product sales.
Thursday, October 08, 2015
Horizon Announces Strategic Partnership with Promega
Partnership to combine Horizon’s genome editing technology with Promega’s reporter technologies to enable personalized drug development.
Tuesday, November 08, 2011
University of Liverpool Scientists to Mine Horizon’s Patient Models for Novel Protein Targets and Biomarkers
The collaboration will identify and validate novel cancer targets and biomarkers for personalized cancer therapy and diagnostics.
Monday, October 19, 2009
Scientific News
Non-Disease Proteins Kill Brain Cells
Scientists at the forefront of cutting-edge research into neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s have shown that the mere presence of protein aggregates may be as important as their form and identity in inducing cell death in brain tissue.
Closing the Loop on an HIV Escape Mechanism
Research team finds that protein motions regulate virus infectivity.
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Gut Microbes Signal to the Brain When They're Full
Don't have room for dessert? The bacteria in your gut may be telling you something.
Turning up the Tap on Microbes Leads to Better Protein Patenting
Mining millions of proteins could become faster and easier with a new technique that may also transform the enzyme-catalyst industry, according to University of California, Davis, researchers.
Exploring the Causes of Cancer
Queen's research to understand the regulation of a cell surface protein involved in cancer.
Measuring microRNAs in Blood to Speed Cancer Detection
A simple, ultrasensitive microRNA sensor holds promise for the design of new diagnostic strategies and, potentially, for the prognosis and treatment of pancreatic and other cancers.
Novel Proteins Linked to Huntington's Disease
University of Florida Health researchers have made a new discovery about Huntington's disease, showing that the gene that causes the fatal disorder makes an unexpected "cocktail" of mutant proteins that accumulate in the brain.
Enzyme Critical to Maintaining Telomere Length Discovered
New method expected to speed understanding of short telomere diseases and cancer.
New Method Identifies Up to Twice as Many Proteins and Peptides
An international team of researchers developed a method that identifies up to twice as many proteins and peptides in mass spectrometry data than conventional approaches.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos