Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

AVEO and Astellas Discontinue Breast Cancer Trial

Published: Friday, January 31, 2014
Last Updated: Friday, January 31, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Joint decision to discontinue trial due to insufficient enrollment.

AVEO Oncology today  announced  that AVEO and Astellas Pharma Inc.  have jointly decided to discontinue the BATON ( Biomarker Assessment of Tivozanib in ONcology ) breast  cancer clinical trial, a Phase 2 study in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), due to insufficient enrollment. AVEO  previously announced that enrollment in this study had been slower than anticipated, and enrollment rates did not improve substantially following additional patient  recruitment efforts.  

“While we believe in the potential benefits of tivozanib for patients with triple  negative breast cancer, we have decided to discontinue the trial because of low patient  accrual,” stated William Slichenmyer, M.D., Sc.M., chief medical officer at AVEO.  “We want to thank the study investigators and their patients who participated in the  trial for their support.” 

The BATON - BC study initiated patient enrollment in December 2012 in a  randomized, double - blind, multicenter Phase 2 clinical trial, evaluating the efficacy of  tivozanib in combination with paclitaxel compared to placebo in combination with  paclitaxel in patients with locally recurrent or metastatic  triple negative breast cancer  who have received no more than one systemic therapy for advanced or metastatic  breast cancer.  All  committed expenses related to the BATON - BC study are shared  equally  between AVEO and  Astellas.  

Separately, as announced in December 2013, data from a planned interim analysis of  the Phase 2 study of tivozanib in patients with colorectal cancer indicate that the study  is unlikely to meet the primary endpoint in the intent - to - treat patient population. Interim data  are being evaluated, and  AVEO and Astellas are in discussions regarding  next steps.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
NIH Supports New Studies to Find Alzheimer’s Biomarkers in Down Syndrome
Initiative will track dementia onset, progress in Down syndrome volunteers.
Dementia Linked to Deficient DNA Repair
Mutant forms of breast cancer factor 1 (BRCA1) are associated with breast and ovarian cancers but according to new findings, in the brain the normal BRCA1 gene product may also be linked to Alzheimer’s disease.
How Cells ‘Climb’ to Build Fruit Fly Tracheas
Mipp1 protein helps cells sprout “fingers” for gripping.
A Cellular Symphony Responsible for Autoimmune Disease
Broad Institute researchers have used a novel approach to increase our understanding of the immune system as a whole.
Non-Disease Proteins Kill Brain Cells
Scientists at the forefront of cutting-edge research into neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s have shown that the mere presence of protein aggregates may be as important as their form and identity in inducing cell death in brain tissue.
Closing the Loop on an HIV Escape Mechanism
Research team finds that protein motions regulate virus infectivity.
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Gut Microbes Signal to the Brain When They're Full
Don't have room for dessert? The bacteria in your gut may be telling you something.
Turning up the Tap on Microbes Leads to Better Protein Patenting
Mining millions of proteins could become faster and easier with a new technique that may also transform the enzyme-catalyst industry, according to University of California, Davis, researchers.
Exploring the Causes of Cancer
Queen's research to understand the regulation of a cell surface protein involved in cancer.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos