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Validation of a 3-Dimensional Human Liver Microtissue Model for Long-term Hepatotoxicity Studies
Brad Larson1, Stewart Hunt2, Timothy Moeller3, Diana Long4, and Peter Banks1

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a class of drug commonly used as analgesics and antipyretics, as well as for management of rheumatological disorders. They are one of the most highly prescribed drug families around the world, and consequently, along with antimicrobial agents, are the most frequent causes of druginduced liver injury (DILI) (Bjornsson et al., 2010).

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Characterization of Proteins and Protein Self Association (Oligomerization) with SEC-MALS
Michel Terray, Mark Pothecary

In this poster, a series of proteins and their oligomers were characterized using SEC-MALS with UV and RI detection. The monomer molecular weights are measured and compared with those from column calibration. The molecular weights of their oligomers are also compared with column calibration and the differences explored.

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Identifying Molecular Signatures of Tumors Using Novel Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Networks
Vishwa Nellore, Chris Dwyer

We developed FRET sensors that can detect 125 fluorophores simultaneously. From experimental analyses of over 1200 time-resolved fluorescence signatures on 300 prototypical sensors, we show that the optical responses are highly repeatable and minor variations between FRET networks can be discriminated resulting in a total of 10^375 unique responses in theory.

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Amino-Coated Metallofullerene Nanoparticles for Glioblastoma Mutiforme Tumor Detection
Tinghui Li , Susan. Murphy, Kanwarpal Bakshi, Steven LaConte, Zhi Sheng, and Harry Dorn

We report the preparation of a new functionalized trimetallic nitride endohedral metallofullerene, with a cage surface consisting of positively charged amino groups, which is expected to bind more efficiently to negatively charged cell phospholipid bi-layer cellular surfaces and will more readily undergo endocytosis. We now report that this Gd-nanoplatform when subsequently conjugated with an IL-13 peptide, (IL-13-Gd3N@C80(OH)x(NH2)y) exhibits enhanced targeting of U-251 GBM cell lines.

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Performance of a hybrid gamma-optical camera for improved utility in diagnostic imaging
L.K. Jambi1, J.E. Lees1, S.L. Bugby1, B.S. Bhatia1,2, M.S. Alqahtani1, W.R. McKnight1, A.H. Ng3 and A.C. Perkins3

Performance of a hybrid gamma-optical camera for improved utility in diagnostic imaging

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Side by Side: An Evaluation of 2D vs. 3D Cell Culture for High Throughput Screening in Drug Discovery
Sophie Quick 1,2, Sinead Knight 1, Jon Winter 3

•3D cell culture has the potential to provide a more physiologically relevant model compared to standard tissue culture plastic.
•From a screening perspective the technology offers the possibility of more predictive drug responses but has an increased cost.
•The question: is it possible and, more importantly, is it worthwhile moving towards screening in High Throughput using a 3D model?

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High Throughput Screening in the European Lead Factory
S.P. van Helden, W.H. Rutjes, C.A.A. van Boeckel and J.H.M. van den Broek

This paper describes workflows that have been implemented at the screening centre of the European Lead Factory and presents screening statistics on the first 18 months of operation.

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Use of a Microlitre Digital Liquid Handler for Screening Applications
Joby Jenkins, Gillian Lewis, Wayne Bowen

Digital dispensing offers researchers the most freedom for experimental design and sample placement with each microplate. It makes it relatively simple to plan and execute the most desirable experimental design and not one predicated by manual or automated liquid handling.

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Progressing 3D Spheroid Analysis into a HTS Drug Discovery Method
Sarah Kessel, Eric Sincoff, Olivier Dery, Lori Fitton

3D Tumorspheroid models for improved predictivity in cancer drug discovery.

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Showing Results 81 - 90 of 252
Scientific News
Long-term Memories Are Maintained by Prion-like Proteins
Research from Eric Kandel’s lab at Columbia University Medical Center has uncovered evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time.
A New Path Towards a Universal Flu Vaccine
New research suggests it may be possible to harness a previously unknown mechanism within the immune system to create more effective and efficient vaccines against this ever-mutating virus.
Brain Cells Switch Epigenetic Gears Throughout Life
Research finds that histone turnover regulates how genes in the brain are turned on and off in response to various stimuli, thereby allowing neurons to form new synaptic connections.
Outsmarting HIV With Vaccine Antigens Made to Order
AIDS vaccine researchers may be one step closer to outwitting HIV, thanks to designer antibodies and antigens made to order at Duke University.
Animals’ Genomic Buffers May Help Humans
Researchers at Duke University School of Medicine and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School have identified a mechanism that explains why some mutations can be disease-causing in one genome but benign in another.
Protein Responsible for Blood Vessel Growth in Tumours Discovered
Scientists have discovered a new protein which triggers the growth of blood vessels in breast cancer tumours which have spread to the brain, a common location which breast cancer can spread to.
New Genetic Form of Obesity and Diabetes Discovered
Scientists have discovered a new inherited form of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans.
Informatics Tool Helps Scientists Prioritize Protein Modification Research
Researchers have developed a new informatics technology that analyzes existing data repositories of protein modifications and 3D protein structures to help scientists identify and target research on "hotspots" most likely to be important for biological function.
Stopping a Single Enzyme Could Help Treat Leukemia
EPFL scientists show how inactivating a single enzyme could effectively eradicate an aggressive form of leukemia. The principles could apply to other cancers as well.
Cell that Replenishes Heart Muscle Found by UT Southwestern Researchers
Researchers devise a new cell-tracing technique to detect cells that do replenish themselves.
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