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FilterMax F5

Product Description
The FilterMax™ F5 Multi-Mode Microplate Readers provide unmatched value and flexibility for a variety of applications capable of performing:

- Absorbance detection in the UV and visible range (230nm to 750nm)
- Fluorescence Intensity (FI) top read & bottom read
- Luminescence (glow)
- Fluorescence Polarization (FP)
- Time-Resolved Fluorescence (TRF)
- Scan measurement types: endpoint, kinetic, multiple wavelength, linear scan and area scan
- Linear and Orbital shaking
- Temperature Control
The FilterMax F5 Series can operate as standalone instruments or can be integrated seamlessly with laboratory automation platforms, and is ideal for a broad range of applications, including drug discovery, genomics, proteomics and cell-based research. The unique patented design ensures precise performance and sensitivity across all detection modes.
Product FilterMax F5
Company Molecular Devices Product Directory
Price Request a quote
More Information View company product page
Catalog Number Unspecified
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Molecular Devices Product Directory
1311 Orleans Drive Sunnyvale, CA 94089-11361 United States

Tel: 1-800-635-5577
Fax: 1-408-548-6439

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