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HU6 Mini - The 6cm wide mini horizontal

Product Description
Scie-Plas™ Green Range™ horizontal gel electrophoresis units offer the ultimate standards in innovative design and manufacture, acquired during our 20-year existence. The Scie-Plas Green Range horizontal gel electrophoresis units currently comprise models with gel tray sizes ranging from 6 x 7.5 to 25 x 30cm. All models incorporate many design and safety features recommended by scientists, either from within our in-house product development team or laboratories worldwide. As a result, all our models are manufactured and finished to the highest specification, easy to use, and, with safety always paramount, CE-marked - conforming to European safety regulations.

The HU6 Mini horizontal gel unit is ideal for routine preparatory and analytical electrophoresis techniques. It has a maximum 32-sample throughput capacity and features a removable gel-casting tray with end gaskets that allow gels to be cast directly within the tank. The gel-casting tray is simply turned at 90° to the direction of electrophoresis, when the end gaskets form a leak proof seal against the inner walls of the running chamber. Once the gel has set and is ready for loading, the gel-casting tray is then restored to its correct orientation in the direction of electrophoresis.

Alternatively, single gels may be cast outside of the tank using HU6-SCG silicone casting gates or HU6-SS Scie-Plas Super-Seals, while up to 3 additional gels may be cast simultaneously within the HU6-CU mini-gel external casting unit.


Complete System
Mini horizontal gel unit with removable casting tray and 2 x 1mm thick, 8-sample combs and coloured loading strips
Unit Dimensions (W x L x H): 13 x 24 x 6.5cm
Gel Dimensions (W x L): 6 x 7.5cm
Buffer Volume: 325ml
Maximum Sample Capacity: 32
Recommended Power Supplies: Consort EV222
Product HU6 Mini - The 6cm wide mini horizontal
Company Scie-Plas Ltd
Price Request a quote
More Information View company product page
Catalog Number Unspecified
Quantity 1
Company Logo

Scie-Plas Ltd
22 Cambridge Science Park Milton Road Cambridge CB4 0FJ UK

Tel: +44 (0) 1223 427888
Fax: +44 (0) 1223 420164

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