Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
RNAi
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

e-Therapeutics Provides Update on Progress of ETS2101 Cancer Trials

Published: Monday, December 24, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, December 24, 2012
Bookmark and Share
Interim data from the trials are expected in H1 2013.

e-Therapeutics plc has provided an update on the clinical trials of its cancer drug ETS2101.

Two phase I studies, one in patients with primary or secondary brain cancer and the other in patients with various solid tumours, remain on track to report final data in Q4 2013 and Q1 2014, respectively.

The phase I studies are designed to select appropriate doses for further trials, assess the safety and pharmacokinetics of ETS2101 and record any initial signs of anti-cancer activity.

They have a dose-escalating design in which successive cohorts of patients receive higher doses of drug until a maximum tolerated dose is identified.

To date 12 patients - two cohorts of three patients in each trial - have been treated. Some patients have completed multiple cycles of treatment with ETS2101; a number continue to be treated having received up to 11 weekly doses.

No patient in either study has so far experienced dose-limiting toxicities or other serious drug-related adverse effects.

Further dose escalation is therefore planned. It is too early to draw any conclusions about the likely maximum tolerated dose of ETS2101 or about other endpoints in the trials.

The brain cancer study is taking place at the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center in La Jolla, California.

Two UK centres, St James’s University Hospital in Leeds and the Northern Centre for Cancer Care at the Freeman Hospital in Newcastle, are conducting the solid tumour trial.

Target enrolment is 24 patients in the brain cancer study and 45 patients in the solid tumour trial.

Professor Santosh Kesari, MD, PhD, director of neuro-oncology at the Moores Cancer Center, the investigator leading the brain cancer study, said “We are delighted to be evaluating the novel anti-cancer agent ETS2101 at our Center. Though we have so far exposed patients only to relatively low doses of the drug, we are reassured that the findings to date suggest good tolerability as we move to enrol additional patients at increasing doses.”

The next dose levels in the phase I trials will exceed those evaluated in earlier studies of the drug as a potential treatment for traumatic brain injury.

Stephen Self, Development Director at e-Therapeutics, commented, “We are conducting a thorough phase I programme to evaluate ETS2101. With recruitment of patients on track, we look forward to providing further updates in the first half of next year.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,200+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

e-Therapeutics Starts Second Phase I Cancer Trial of ETS2101
Trial will enrol up to 45 patients with solid tumours at UK centres.
Friday, February 01, 2013
e-Therapeutics’ ETS2101 Enters Phase I Clinical Trial in Brain Cancer
First findings are expected in late 2012.
Wednesday, June 20, 2012
Scientific News
Contagious Cancers Are Spreading in Shellfish
Direct transmission of cancer among some marine animals may be more common than once thought, suggests a new study published in Nature by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC).
Contagious Cancers Are Spreading in Shellfish
Direct transmission of cancer among some marine animals may be more common than once thought, suggests a new study published in Nature by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC).
Fix for 3-Billion-Year-Old Genetic Error
Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a fix that allows RNA to accurately proofread for the first time.
Revealing the Genetic Causes of Bowel Cancer
A landmark study has given the most detailed picture yet of the genetics of bowel cancer — the UK's fourth most common cancer.
Self-Assembling Protein Shell for Drug Delivery
Made-to-order nano-cages open possibilities of shipping cargo into living cells or fashioning small chemical reactors.
Fighting Resistant Blood Cancer Cells
Biologists present new findings on chronic myeloid leukemia and possible therapeutic approaches.
Tumor Cells Develop Predictable Characteristics
Scientists have discovered that cancer cells at the edge of a tumor that are close to the surrounding environment are predictably different from the cells within the interior of the tumor.
Guided Chemotherapy Missiles
Latching chemotherapy drugs onto proteins that seek out tumors could provide a new way of treating tumors in the brain or with limited blood supply that are hard to reach with traditional chemotherapy.
Solutions for Biotherapeutic Characterization
Innovation to speed the routine.
What Makes a Good Scientist?
It’s the journey, not just the destination that counts as a scientist when conducting research.
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,200+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!