Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
RNAi
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Ovarian Cancer Stem Cell Study puts Targeted Therapies Within Reach

Published: Tuesday, January 08, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, January 08, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have identified a key link between stem cell factors that fuel ovarian cancer’s growth and patient prognosis.

The study, which paves the way for developing novel targeted ovarian cancer therapies, is published online in the current issue of Cell Cycle.

Lead author Dr. Yingqun Huang, associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, and her colleagues have demonstrated a connection between two concepts that are revolutionizing the way cancer is treated.

First, the “cancer stem cell” idea suggests that at the heart of every tumor there is a small subset of difficult-to-identify tumor cells that fuel the growth of the bulk of the tumor. This concept predicts that ordinary therapies typically kill the bulk of tumor cells while leaving a rich environment for continued growth of the stem cell tumor population. The second concept, dubbed “seed and soil,” defines a critical role for the tumor cells’ “microenvironment,” which is the special environment required for cancer cell growth and spread.

“Both concepts have particular relevance for the treatment of adult solid tumors such as ovarian cancer, which has been notoriously difficult to diagnose and treat,” said co-author Nita J. Maihle, professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences and a member of Yale Cancer Center. “Ovarian cancer patients are plagued by recurrences of tumor cells that are resistant to chemotherapy, ultimately leading to uncontrolled cancer growth and death.”

In this study, Huang and her colleagues were able to define a molecular basis for the interplay between these two concepts in ovarian cancer. They did this by using sophisticated gene sequencing methods to demonstrate a regulatory link between the stem cell factor Lin28 and the signaling molecule bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4).

“These results are supported by the latest molecular ovarian cancer prognosis data, which also suggest an active role for the tumor microenvironment in ovarian carcinogenesis,” said Huang and Maihle. “Together these studies reveal new targets for the development of cancer therapies.”


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,400+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Single-Cell, 42-plexed Protein Analysis Achieved with a New Microchip Technology
A novel microdevice capable of detecting 42 unique immune effector proteins has been developed.
Tuesday, February 17, 2015
Yale Team Identifies Key Process In Brain Development
miR-107 shown to play essential role in regulating normal brain development.
Friday, February 06, 2015
Healthy Brain Development Balanced on Edge of a Cellular ‘Sword’
The study helps explain the molecular basis of complex brain abnormalities.
Wednesday, December 24, 2014
New Class of Synthetic Molecules Mimics Antibodies
A Yale University lab has crafted the first synthetic molecules that have both the targeting and response functions of antibodies.
Wednesday, December 24, 2014
Reversing The Effects Of Pulmonary Fibrosis
Study shows potential for reversing the effects of pulmonary fibrosis with a microRNA mimic.
Wednesday, September 24, 2014
Immune Cells get Cancer-Fighting Boost From Nanomaterials
Yale researchers used bundled carbon nanotubes to incubate cytotoxic T cells.
Monday, August 18, 2014
Awakening Genes that Suppress Tumors
When genes that normally suppress tumor growth are themselves suppressed, cancer cells can grow and proliferate uncontrollably.
Tuesday, October 15, 2013
New Study Changes View about the Genetics of Leukemia Risk
A gene that helps keep blood free of cancer is controlled by tiny pieces of RNA, a finding that may lead to better ways to diagnose blood cancers.
Tuesday, October 15, 2013
Analysis of Little-Explored Regions of Genome Reveals Dozens of Cancer Triggers
A massive data analysis of natural genetic variants in humans and variants in cancer tumors has implicated dozens of mutations in the development of breast and prostate cancer.
Friday, October 04, 2013
Detecting Breast Cancer: 3-D Screening Reduces Recall Rates
Tomosynthesis, or 3-D mammography, significantly reduced the number of patients being recalled for additional testing after receiving a mammogram.
Tuesday, July 30, 2013
Surprising Mechanism Discovered in Polycystic Kidney Disease
A study has uncovered a new and unexpected molecular mechanism in the development of polycystic kidney disease, or PKD.
Monday, July 29, 2013
Metastatic Tumor a Hybrid of Cancer Cell and White Blood Cell
Scientists have found evidence that a human metastatic tumor can arise when a leukocyte and a cancer cell fuse to form a genetic hybrid.
Monday, July 08, 2013
Brain-Penetrating Particle Attacks Deadly Tumors
Researchers have shown that a new approach extends the lives of laboratory animals and are preparing to seek government approval for a human clinical trial.
Wednesday, July 03, 2013
Promising Drug Prevents Cancer Cells from Shutting Down Immune System
An investigational drug that targets the immune system’s ability to fight cancer is showing promising results in Yale Cancer Center (YCC) patients.
Monday, June 10, 2013
Combined Immunotherapy Shows Promising Results Against Advanced Melanoma
Combining two cancer immunotherapy drugs in patients with advanced melanoma produced rates of tumor regression that appeared greater than in prior trials with either drug alone.
Monday, June 10, 2013
Scientific News
RNAi Screening Trends
Understand current trends and learn which application areas are expected to gain in popularity over the next few years.
New Weapon in the Fight Against Blood Cancer
This strategy, which uses patients’ own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable.
TOPLESS Plants Provide Clues to Human Molecular Interactions
Scientists at Van Andel Research Institute have revealed an important molecular mechanism in plants that has significant similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans, which are closely linked to early embryonic development and to diseases such as cancer.
Toxin from Salmonid Fish has Potential to Treat Cancer
Researchers from the University of Freiburg decode molecular mechanism of fish pathogen.
Scientists Create CRISPR/Cas9 Knock-In Mutations in Human T Cells
In a project spearheaded by investigators at UC San Francisco, scientists have devised a new strategy to precisely modify human T cells using the genome-editing system known as CRISPR/Cas9.
Long-sought Discovery Fills in Missing Details of Cell 'Switchboard'
A biomedical breakthrough reveals never-before-seen details of the human body’s cellular switchboard that regulates sensory and hormonal responses.
Tracking Breast Cancer Before it Grows
A team of scientists led by University of Saskatchewan researcher Saroj Kumar is using cutting-edge Canadian Light Source techniques to screen and treat breast cancer at its earliest changes.
New Mussel-Inspired Surgical Protein Glue
Korean scientists have developed a light-activated, mussel protein-based bioadhesive that works on the same principles as mussels attaching to underwater surfaces and insects maintaining structural balance and flexibility.
Web App Helps Researchers Explore Cancer Genetics
Brown University computer scientists have developed a new interactive tool to help researchers and clinicians explore the genetic underpinnings of cancer.
Researchers Develop Vaccine that Protects Primates Against Ebola
A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and the National Institutes of Health have developed an inhalable vaccine that protects primates against Ebola.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,400+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!