Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Ribosomal RNA Removal and Directional Library Generation in One Package

Published: Thursday, March 21, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, March 21, 2013
Bookmark and Share
ScriptSeq™ Complete kits available for human, mouse and rat samples.

Cambio have added a new range of products to their portfolio. The ScriptSeq™ Complete kits seamlessly combine Epicentre’s powerful Ribo-Zero™ technology and rapid ScriptSeq™ v2 procedure for end-to-end preparation of RNA Sequence libraries in just one day.

The kits enable life scientists to quickly produce directional, paired-end RNA-Seq libraries, typically containing less than 3% rRNA reads, from as little as 100 ng total RNA.

48 ScriptSeq™ Index PCR Primers are available separately for preparing barcoded libraries.

Until the 31 December 2012, researchers can get a free ScriptSeq™ Index PCR Primer set with the purchase of every 24 reaction ScriptSeq™ Complete kit.

ScriptSeq™ Complete kits are currently available for human, mouse and rat samples, but Complete kits for bacteria and plants are expected in early 2013.

ScriptSeq™ Complete kits remove the need to purchase separate kits for the different steps of RNA-Seq library generation, thereby reducing the risk of possible sample loss, hold-ups and unexpected costs.

The Complete kits have been designed for a rapid, simple workflow, and are less expensive than buying the components separately.

Cambio is dedicated to providing UK laboratories with the most efficient and effective tools for life science applications.

Fully supported by top quality, tailored customer service, users are supplied with a complete solution that allows them to see the entire RNA-seq process through from start to finish.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Mathematical Model Forecasts the Path of Breast Cancer
Chances of survival depend on which organs breast cancer tumors colonize first.
Exploring the Causes of Cancer
Queen's research to understand the regulation of a cell surface protein involved in cancer.
Nanocarriers May Carry New Hope for Brain Cancer Therapy
Berkeley lab researchers develop nanoparticles that can carry therapeutics across the brain blood barrier.
RNA-Based Drugs Give More Control Over Gene Editing
CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technique can be transiently activated and inactivated using RNA-based drugs, giving researchers more precise control in correcting and inactivating genes.
University of Glasgow Researchers Make An Impact in 60 Seconds
Early-career researchers were invited to submit an engaging, dynamic and compelling 60 second video illuminating an aspect of their research.
Metabolic Profiles Distinguish Early Stage Ovarian Cancer with Unprecedented Accuracy
Studying blood serum compounds of different molecular weights has led scientists to a set of biomarkers that may enable development of a highly accurate screening test for early-stage ovarian cancer.
Dead Bacteria to Kill Colorectal Cancer
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) have successfully used dead bacteria to kill colorectal cancer cells.
CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Editing: Check Three Times, Cut Once
Two new studies from UC Berkeley should give scientists who use CRISPR-Cas9 for genome engineering greater confidence that they won’t inadvertently edit the wrong DNA.
Genetically Engineering Algae to Kill Cancer Cells
New interdisciplinary research has revealed the frontline role tiny algae could play in the battle against cancer, through the innovative use of nanotechnology.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos