Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
RNAi
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

NIH Trial Shows Promising Results in Treating a Lymphoma in Young People

Published: Friday, April 12, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, April 12, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Studies demonstrate that the use of rituximab in the drug regimen may improve treatment.

Patients with a type of cancer known as primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma who received infusions of chemotherapy, but who did not have radiation therapy to an area of the thorax known as the mediastinum, had excellent outcomes, according to clinical trial results.

Until now, most standard treatment approaches for patients with this type of lymphoma have included radiation therapy to the mediastinum. However, mediastinal radiation is associated with substantial long-term toxic side effects.

The results of this single arm trial, which followed 51 patients for a period of up to 14 years, was conducted by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and appeared April 11, 2013, in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma mainly affects people from their teenage years to their early 30s.

Many patients are cured with a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. However, even with this treatment, about 20 percent of patients see their disease progress.

Most patients receive radiation to the chest area, which can cause new cancers as well as damage to the heart. This is particularly a problem for young people because the risk of new cancers and heart disease continues to increase as they get older.

Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma is also more common in women, who are at greater risk of developing breast cancer from radiation therapy to the chest.

Wyndham Wilson, M.D., Ph.D., head of NCI’s Lymphoma Therapeutics Section, and colleagues conducted the trial, in which every patient received the drugs etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, and rituximab in a regimen known as dose-adjusted EPOCH-R, or DA-EPOCH-R.

This regimen uses infusion strategies in which doses of the drugs etoposide, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide are adjusted for greatest efficacy.

Fifty-one patients with untreated primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma were included in this phase II study. The maximum tumor diameter was 11 centimeters.

All but two patients achieved a complete remission with DA-EPOCH-R therapy, and none of the patients with a complete remission have developed a recurrent lymphoma.

The two patients who did not achieve a complete remission received radiation and have also not had their tumors recur. There was no evidence of other diseases developing later on or cardiac toxic effects.

“The high success of this regimen in greatly reducing the need for radiation and improving the cure rate in this disease may relate to specialized dosing and continuous infusion delivery of the EPOCH-R agents,” said Wilson.

To provide an independent assessment of their DA-EPOCH-R trial results, the researchers collaborated with investigators at Stanford University (Calif.) Medical Center, who had used this regimen to treat 16 patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma.

The patients were similar to those treated in the NCI study except for being slightly older and having a lower frequency of disease outside the mediastinum. All 16 Stanford patients who received this regimen are also in remission and none required radiation treatment.

Studies have suggested that primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma has a better outcome with more dose-intense regimens. Other studies have also demonstrated that the use of rituximab in the drug regimen may improve treatment, hence the use of DA-EPOCH-R as opposed to just EPOCH.

“For me, these results are exciting and demonstrate that, using this approach, almost all patients appear to be cured and very few patients require radiation,” said Kieron Dunleavy, M.D., NCI, and first author on the study.

Dunleavy continued, “Based on our results, an international phase II trial of DA-EPOCH-R in pediatric patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma is ongoing to confirm these findings, and we hope this international trial will have a similarly positive outcome.”


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Cellular Factors that Shape the 3D Landscape of the Genome Identified
Researchers have identified 50 cellular factors required for the proper 3D positioning of genes by using novel large-scale imaging technology.
Tuesday, August 18, 2015
Tell-tale Biomarker Detects Early Breast Cancer in NIH-funded Study
The study published online in the issue of Nature Communications.
Thursday, August 13, 2015
Study Shows Promise of Precision Medicine for Most Common Type of Lymphoma
The study appeared online July 20, 2015, in Nature Medicine.
Tuesday, July 21, 2015
Potential Therapeutic for Blinding Eye Disease
NIH research points to microglia as potential therapeutic target in retinitis pigmentosa.
Thursday, July 02, 2015
NCI-MATCH Trial will Link Targeted Cancer Drugs to Gene Abnormalities
Precision medicine trial will open to patient enrollment in July.
Tuesday, June 09, 2015
Linking Targeted Cancer Drugs to Gene Abnormalities
Investigators at the NIH have announced a series of clinical trials that will study drugs or drug combinations that target specific genetic mutations.
Wednesday, June 03, 2015
Lipid Nanoparticle Therapeutic Treats Ebola in Monkeys
A newly designed agent was effective in treating monkeys infected with a deadly Ebola virus strain.
Wednesday, May 06, 2015
Possible Treatment for Lethal Pediatric Brain Cancer
NIH-funded preclinical study suggests epigenetic drugs may be used to treat leading cause of pediatric brain cancer death.
Tuesday, May 05, 2015
NIH Study Finds Genetic Link for Rare Intestinal Cancer
Researchers recommend screening for people with family history.
Friday, April 17, 2015
Novel Approach Gives Insights Into Tumor Development
Scientists used a powerful new technique to turn off all the genes in mouse lung cancer cells and test how they affect tumor growth and metastasis.
Tuesday, March 24, 2015
Strengthening the Immune System’s Fight Against Brain Cancer
NIH-funded research suggests novel way to improve vaccine efficacy in brain tumors.
Friday, March 20, 2015
Range of Molecular Alterations in Head and Neck Cancers Uncovered
TCGA tumor genome sequencing analyses offer new insights into the effects of HPV and smoking, and find genomic similarities with other cancers.
Thursday, January 29, 2015
NIH Researchers Tackle Thorny Side of Gene Therapy
Pre-clinical studies in mice reveal ways to reduce cancer risk with modified treatment.
Wednesday, January 21, 2015
NIH Exceptional Responders to Cancer Therapy Study Launched
Study to investigate the molecular factors of tumors associated with exceptional treatment responses of cancer patients to drug therapies.
Friday, September 26, 2014
NIH Announces the Launch of 3 Integrated Precision Medicine Trials
ALCHEMIST is for patients with certain types of early-stage lung cancer.
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
Scientific News
Microscopic Fish are 3D-Printed to do More Than Swim
Researchers demonstrate a novel method to build microscopic robots with complex shapes and functionalities.
Inciting an Immune Attack on Cancer Cells
A new minimally invasive vaccine that combines cancer cells and immune-enhancing factors could be used clinically to launch a destructive attack on tumors.
Reprogramming Cancer Cells
Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a way to potentially reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy.
New Strategy for Combating Adenoviruses
Using an animal model they developed, Saint Louis University and Utah State university researchers have identified a strategy that could keep a common group of viruses called adenoviruses from replicating and causing sickness in humans.
Surprising Mechanism Behind Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Uncovered
Now, scientists at TSRI have discovered that the important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, develops resistance to this drug by “switching on” a previously uncharacterized set of genes.
Fat in the Family?
Study could lead to therapeutics that boost metabolism.
Imaging Software Could Speed Up Breast Cancer Diagnosis
Researchers use high speed optical microscopy of intact breast tissue specimens to analyze breast tissue.
A Metabolic Master Switch Underlying Human Obesity
Researchers find pathway that controls metabolism by prompting fat cells to store or burn fat.
Synthetic DNA Vaccine Against MERS Shows Promise
A novel synthetic DNA vaccine can, for the first time, induce protective immunity against the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus in animal species.
How Small RNA Helps Form Memories
In a new study, a team of scientists at Scripps Florida has found that a type of genetic material called "microRNA" (miRNA) plays surprisingly different roles in the formation of memory in animal models.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!