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Rexahn Awarded U.S. Patent for Novel Anti-Cancer Compounds

Published: Wednesday, June 19, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, June 19, 2013
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Company announced that it has significantly expanded its intellectual property around a series of novel anti-tumor quinazoline compounds.

Rexahn has been issued patent No. 8,404,698 from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, covering these novel quinazoline compounds, their pharmaceutical composition, and method for producing an anti-tumor effect.

The series of compounds included in this issued patent are inhibitors of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFRs are cell surface receptors and mutations in these receptors can cause accelerated cell growth leading to lung and colon cancer. Mutated EGFRs account for approximately 30% of epithelial cancers. In preclinical trials, Rexahn’s patented compounds have demonstrated oral bioavailability and anti-tumor activity in an animal model that did not respond well to Taxol, an oncology drug used to treat lung, breast and ovarian cancer.

“With the granting of this patent, Rexahn is strongly positioned to develop this emerging class of exciting new oncology compounds and expand our preclinical pipeline. The preclinical activity of these compounds suggest their potential utility to treat multiple forms of cancer including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), colon cancer, head and neck cancer and glioblastoma multiforme,” said Peter D. Suzdak, CEO of Rexahn.

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