Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

DiaTech Oncology Test Shows Positive Results

Published: Thursday, June 20, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, June 20, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Test identifies new therapeutic strategies for patients with lung cancer and ovarian cancer.

DiaTech Oncology has developed a predictive test that has been effective in clinical trials in helping oncologists determine the best chemotherapy treatment plans and therapeutic strategies for more than 50 types of cancers. The company has just published detailed results of the clinical trials for mesothelioma lung cancer, small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and advanced stage III and IV ovarian cancer at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conference held in Chicago.

The ASCO event, considered the world’s premiere oncology conference, features cutting-edge scientific presentations and attracts more than 25,000 oncology professionals yearly.

In previous clinical trials and published research, DiaTech Oncology’s predictive test – the MiCK® assay or Correct Chemo™ – showed an increase in complete or partial response rates, longer time to relapse and longer survival times for multiple types of cancer, including acute myeloid leukemia, lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and breast, bladder, ovarian, endometrial and lung cancers.

DiaTech has conducted extensive research on patients with ovarian cancer; however, the results published at ASCO were the first for advanced stage III and IV ovarian cancer or ovarian cancer patients who have relapsed and have resistance to one of the most commonly used chemotherapy drugs, carboplatin. Trial results showed that the MiCK assay can identify alternative chemotherapy treatments for ovarian cancer patients who have relapsing disease and carboplatin resistance.

Clinical results published at ASCO for mesothelioma are significantly notable because there are limited therapies currently available for this rare disease, which medical experts regard as one of the most aggressive and deadly of all cancers. The study was able to identify new chemotherapy strategies that could possibly help control mesothelioma in individual patients.

“DiaTech is the only test on the market that guides the treating oncologist to the most effective chemotherapy for inducing cell death in the malignant cells of a particular cancer patient,” says Cary Presant, M.D., DiaTech Chief Medical Officer. “Our clinical tests consistently reveal longer survival times and lower costs for chemotherapy cancer patients. We will carry on in our important work with our key institutional research partners. Our studies are yielding unexpected new leads for innovative therapeutic strategies.“

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
New Class of RNA Tumor Suppressors Identified
Two short, “housekeeping” RNA molecules block cancer growth by binding to an important cancer-associated protein called KRAS. More than a quarter of all human cancers are missing these RNAs.
Mathematical Model Forecasts the Path of Breast Cancer
Chances of survival depend on which organs breast cancer tumors colonize first.
Exploring the Causes of Cancer
Queen's research to understand the regulation of a cell surface protein involved in cancer.
Nanocarriers May Carry New Hope for Brain Cancer Therapy
Berkeley lab researchers develop nanoparticles that can carry therapeutics across the brain blood barrier.
RNA-Based Drugs Give More Control Over Gene Editing
CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technique can be transiently activated and inactivated using RNA-based drugs, giving researchers more precise control in correcting and inactivating genes.
University of Glasgow Researchers Make An Impact in 60 Seconds
Early-career researchers were invited to submit an engaging, dynamic and compelling 60 second video illuminating an aspect of their research.
Metabolic Profiles Distinguish Early Stage Ovarian Cancer with Unprecedented Accuracy
Studying blood serum compounds of different molecular weights has led scientists to a set of biomarkers that may enable development of a highly accurate screening test for early-stage ovarian cancer.
Dead Bacteria to Kill Colorectal Cancer
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) have successfully used dead bacteria to kill colorectal cancer cells.
CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Editing: Check Three Times, Cut Once
Two new studies from UC Berkeley should give scientists who use CRISPR-Cas9 for genome engineering greater confidence that they won’t inadvertently edit the wrong DNA.
Genetically Engineering Algae to Kill Cancer Cells
New interdisciplinary research has revealed the frontline role tiny algae could play in the battle against cancer, through the innovative use of nanotechnology.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos