Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
RNAi
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Scientists Propose a Molecular Explanation for Degenerative Disease

Published: Monday, August 19, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, August 19, 2013
Bookmark and Share
An international collaboration has shed new light on the origins and molecular causes of age related degenerative conditions including Motor Neurone Disease (MND).

The new perspective provided by this work may lead the way to new treatments and early diagnoses.

The article which has just been published in the leading peer reviewed, international journal Cell, offers new opportunities for early diagnosis of age related degenerative diseases before symptoms appear, including through the identification of disease causing genes. It also suggests specific strategies for developing therapies which might have both preventative and therapeutic benefits for this class of degenerative disease.

Commenting on the significance of the findings co-lead author Professor Mani Ramaswami, Professor of Neurogenetics at the School of Genetics and Microbiology, Trinity College Dublin said: “Degenerative diseases, such as MND, are a poorly understood and largely untreatable set of life limiting diseases which can leave people unable to do the everyday things that the rest of us, particularly the young, take for granted. These age-associated diseases have far-reaching socioeconomic impacts. If you can predict the disease you may be in a position to slow down its onset and progression through therapeutic interventions. With these types of diseases this is significantly more effective than trying to treat the condition once symptoms have appeared. The potential for early diagnosis and delaying the onset of motor or cognitive decline by perhaps ten years is of potentially profound importance in an ageing society.”

There are nearly 120,000 cases of MND diagnosed worldwide each year with about 300 people in Ireland living with the disease at any one time.

The research just published proposes that the normal biology of mRNA regulation in neurones, in which RNA is generally silenced and only activated in the correct place and time, makes it susceptible to both age-related decline and disturbance by genetic mutation. Altered RNA regulation (ribostasis), therefore, may be a frequent causative factor in degenerative disease.  While normal RNA regulation involves regulated and reversible assembly of RNA-protein particles, both increased cellular age and mutation push the process towards hyperassembly, which leads to altered pools of RNA or RNA regulatory proteins in neurones that contribute to their eventual death.

Co-authors of the publication, Professors Ramaswami, Taylor (St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis) and Parker (University of Colorado)* have based their model on a synthesis of findings from their collaborations and recent work by their individual research groups.

Research on neuronal RNA regulation in Professor Ramaswami's lab is funded by Science Foundation Ireland and benefits from collaborations with the National Centre for Biological Sciences Bangalore.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 4,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 5,300+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Blueprinting Cell Membrane Proteins
Recent breakthrough will make the blueprinting process faster, easier and cheaper, and should have major implications in the field of drug discovery and development.
Monday, June 08, 2015
Scientific News
New Mechanism to Control Human Viral Infections Discovered
Researchers discover long sought after mechanism in human cells that could help treat diseases caused by viruses.
Study Reveals New Role for Hippo Pathway in Suppressing Cancer Immunity
Hippo pathway signaling regulates organ size by moderating cell growth, apoptosis and stem cell renewal, but dysregulation contributes to cancer development.
RNAi Activated in Response to Influenza
Discovery could lead to better ways of combating serious infections, including Ebola and Zika.
Gene Therapy Maintains Clotting Factor for Hemophilia Patients
Following a single gene therapy dose, the highest levels of an essential blood clotting factor IX were observed in hemophilia B patients.
Transporting Microscopic Cargo Between Human Cells
Scientists have developed a virus-inspired delivery system for material transport between cells.
Improving Drug Production with Computer Model
A model has been developed that can be used to improve and accelerate the production of biotherapeutics, cancer drugs, and vaccines.
Turning Off Asthma Attacks
Researchers discover a critical cellular “off” switch for the inflammatory immune response that causes asthma attacks.
New Strategy May Drop Cancer’s Guard
Scientists eye ways to deconstruct tumors’ protective wall with current diabetes drug.
Scientists Identify Unique Genomic Features in Testicular Cancer
The findings may shed light on factors in other cancers that influence their sensitivity to chemotherapy.
Smart Patch Releases Blood Thinners When Needed
Researchers have developed a smart patch that activelly monitors a patient's blood and releases blood thinning drugs when necessary.
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
4,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,300+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!