Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
RNAi
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Scientists Design Protein to Prevent Prostate Cancer Cell Growth

Published: Thursday, January 30, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, January 30, 2014
Bookmark and Share
New protein blocks the hormone receptors and consequently stops cancer cells from growing in the laboratory.

Researchers are creating a "designer" protein that could be effective at treating prostate cancer when other therapies fail.

In laboratory tests, the protein hindered the growth of cancer cells even in conditions where conventional therapies are ineffective.

The researchers, from Imperial College London and the University of Essex, hope to develop the protein into a therapeutic that could be trialled in patients within five years.

The findings are published in the journal Oncotarget.

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in men. Around 37,000 UK men are diagnosed with the disease each year. Many prostate cancers develop very slowly, but in a small proportion of cases the cancer grows more quickly and spreads to other areas of the body, sometimes proving fatal.

Prostate cancers are only able to grow when they are exposed to male hormones such as testosterone. These hormones bring about their effects by binding to specific receptors. Many existing therapies target these receptors, yet after an average of two years the cancer becomes resistant to treatment. In this phase, hormones continue to drive the growth of cancer cells.

In this new study, the researchers have designed a new protein which blocks the hormone receptors and consequently stops prostate cancer cells from growing in the laboratory. The therapy was successful even in circumstances that lead to the failure of conventional treatments.

Dr Charlotte Bevan, senior author of the study, from the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College London said: "Eleven thousand men die from prostate cancer each year in the UK. Existing treatments are good at first but frequently fail after a couple of years. Once the cancer moves to the more aggressive stage, there are few therapies available.

"Our team is seeking to design a new therapy that will help patients once the other ones have failed. There is a lot of research supporting the idea that the androgen receptor continues to drive prostate cancer growth, so we have been investigating novel methods to block this pathway."

The team is designing a novel therapy by combining two separate proteins to create a hybrid. One half binds to the receptor, whilst the other half blocks the receptor's activity. The research demonstrates that both of these factors are important in blocking activity, and consequently the growth of the cancer.

"So far, the research has only been carried out in prostate cancer cells in the laboratory. These proof of principle experiments are really promising, but more work is needed before these therapies are ready for clinical trials" said Dr Greg Brooke, first author of the study, now at the School of Biological Sciences, University of Essex. "The next step is to continue research in cell models to refine the therapy into something that is specific, potent and easy to deliver.

"It's exciting to think that this research could offer new hope for men with advanced prostate cancer."


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

New Drug Target Identified for Serious Heart and Lung Condition
A gene has been identified that sheds new light on a potentially fatal heart and lung condition and could lead to a new treatment.
Friday, August 14, 2015
Gene Therapy for Cystic Fibrosis Shows Encouraging Trial Results
A therapy that replaces the faulty gene responsible for cystic fibrosis in patients' lungs has produced encouraging results in a major UK trial.
Friday, July 03, 2015
Researchers Develop New Breath Test to Diagnose Oesophageal and Gastric Cancer
Test will now be tested in a larger trial involving three hospitals in London.
Tuesday, June 23, 2015
Imperial Researchers Win Health Foundation Grant for Cancer Innovation Study
Each project will receive over £450,000 of funding to support the research.
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
Engineering Bacteria for Vaccine Delivery
An eight million Euro project has been launched with the aim of engineering bacteria to deliver vaccines against antibiotic-resistant infections.
Monday, May 18, 2015
Diet Swap has Dramatic Effects on Colon Cancer Risk for Americans and Africans
New study confirms that a high fibre diet can substantially reduce risk.
Saturday, May 02, 2015
Protein That Boosts Immunity to Viruses and Cancer Discovered
Researchers now developing a gene therapy designed to boost the infection-fighting cells.
Saturday, April 18, 2015
New Test can Help Doctors Choose Best Treatment for Ovarian Cancer
ADNEX discriminate between benign and malignant tumours with a high level of accuracy.
Friday, October 17, 2014
New Cancer Drug To Begin Trials In Multiple Myeloma Patients
Scientists at Imperial College London have developed a new cancer drug which they plan to trial in multiple myeloma patients by the end of next year.
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
First Pictures of BRCA2 Protein Show How it Works to Repair DNA
Researchers purified the protein and used electron microscopy to reveal its structure.
Thursday, October 09, 2014
Protein ‘Map’ Could Lead to Potent New Cancer Drugs
Findings will help scientists to design drugs that could target NMT enzyme.
Saturday, September 27, 2014
What Lies Behind the Death of Stem Cells
Researchers have identified key processes that control stem cell survival, providing insights that could improve their use in medicine.
Friday, September 19, 2014
Self-assembling Nanoparticle Could Improve MRI Scanning for Cancer Diagnosis
Scientists have designed the nanoparticle that targets tumours, to help doctors diagnose cancer earlier.
Wednesday, July 16, 2014
UN Targets on Health Risk Factors can Prevent 37 Million Deaths by 2025
Reaching globally-agreed targets for health risks such as smoking and alcohol can prevent more than 37 million deaths by 2025.
Tuesday, May 13, 2014
Designer Protein to Prevent Prostate Cancer Cell Growth
Researchers are creating a "designer" protein that could be effective at treating prostate cancer when other therapies fail.
Friday, January 17, 2014
Scientific News
Microscopic Fish are 3D-Printed to do More Than Swim
Researchers demonstrate a novel method to build microscopic robots with complex shapes and functionalities.
Inciting an Immune Attack on Cancer Cells
A new minimally invasive vaccine that combines cancer cells and immune-enhancing factors could be used clinically to launch a destructive attack on tumors.
Reprogramming Cancer Cells
Researchers on Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus have discovered a way to potentially reprogram cancer cells back to normalcy.
New Strategy for Combating Adenoviruses
Using an animal model they developed, Saint Louis University and Utah State university researchers have identified a strategy that could keep a common group of viruses called adenoviruses from replicating and causing sickness in humans.
Surprising Mechanism Behind Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Uncovered
Now, scientists at TSRI have discovered that the important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, develops resistance to this drug by “switching on” a previously uncharacterized set of genes.
Fat in the Family?
Study could lead to therapeutics that boost metabolism.
Imaging Software Could Speed Up Breast Cancer Diagnosis
Researchers use high speed optical microscopy of intact breast tissue specimens to analyze breast tissue.
A Metabolic Master Switch Underlying Human Obesity
Researchers find pathway that controls metabolism by prompting fat cells to store or burn fat.
Synthetic DNA Vaccine Against MERS Shows Promise
A novel synthetic DNA vaccine can, for the first time, induce protective immunity against the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus in animal species.
How Small RNA Helps Form Memories
In a new study, a team of scientists at Scripps Florida has found that a type of genetic material called "microRNA" (miRNA) plays surprisingly different roles in the formation of memory in animal models.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!