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Bioo Scientific First to Address Small RNA-Seq Bias Concerns

Published: Wednesday, August 13, 2014
Last Updated: Wednesday, August 13, 2014
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Company launches NEXTflex™ Small RNA Sequencing Kit v2.

Bioo Scientific has launched the patent pending NEXTflex™ Small RNA Sequencing Kit v2, which utilizes randomized adapters to significantly reduce ligation bias from library preparation, resulting in the most accurate data available, as illustrated in a number of published papers.

The NEXTflex Small RNA Sequencing Kit v2 provides an easy, flexible, cost-effective solution for generating small RNA libraries for sequencing on Illumina sequencing platforms.

Traditional small RNA sequencing introduces bias at the ligation step, because no single adapter sequence is able to efficiently ligate to all small RNAs.

The NEXTflex Small RNA-Seq Library Prep Kit v2 overcomes this bias using randomized sequences at the ligation site. This randomized adapter strategy allows small RNAs of any sequence to “find” their respective optimal adapter, resulting in small RNA libraries with a dramatic reduction in bias.

The NEXTflex Small RNA Sequencing Kit v2 allows users to generate libraries directly from isolated small RNAs, microRNAs or total RNA. The protocol is designed to significantly reduce adapter dimer formation using an adapter depletion solution. Barcoded primers, added during PCR, are available separately, allowing up to 48 samples to be multiplexed.

According to Dr. Masoud Toloue, VP, Genomic Research, “One of Bioo Scientific’s primary focuses is the reduction of biases associated with next generation sequencing. The incorporation of randomized adapters is the latest innovative technology we’ve put into practice that allows for the most accurate sequencing-based measurement of small RNAs.”

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