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Simultaneous RT-qPCR Measurement of 1718 Long Non-Coding RNAs
Pieter Mestdagh, Barbara D’haene, Jan Hellemans and Jo Vandesompele

Massively parallel RNA-sequencing revealed that the human genome is pervasively transcribed, resulting in the production of thousands of non-coding RNA transcripts.

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ChIP-qPCR and qbasePLUS Jointly Identify a MYCN Activated miRNA Cluster in Cancer
Barbara D’haene, Pieter Mestdagh, Daniel Muth, Frank Westerman, Frank Speleman and Jo Vandesompele

This study applies ChIP-qPCR tp assess binding of transcription factor MYCN to miRNA cluster 17-92, to positive control target MDM2, and to a negative control target region.

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Modeling Drug Disposition of Timolol in Ocular Tissues of Rabbit following Topical Eye Drops
S. Ray Chaudhuri, V. Lukacova, W.S. Woltosz

A serious disadvantage of ocular timolol therapy is the amount of drug getting into systemic circulation that adversely affects vital organ functions in elderly patients.

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Isolation of Urinary Exosomal miRNAs: Comparative Analysis of Different Methods
Sarath Kiran Channavajjhala, Marzia Rossato, Francesca Morandini, Annalisa Castagna, Flavia Bazzoni and Oliviero Olivieri

This study aims to identify and develop a robust and economical method for isolation of urinary exosomal miRNAs that can be routinely used for the analysis of miRNAs in different pathological conditions.

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Cytotoxicity Screen of Mangiferin and its Major Metabolite Norathyriol in Human Tumor Cell Lines
Souza, J.R.R., Feitosa, J.P.A., Ricardo, N.M.P.S, Trevisan, M.T.S., Frei, E., Ulrich C.M., Owen, R.W.

Many natural products are available worldwide as potential chemoprotective agents against commonly occurring cancers, for example Mangiferin which has low bioavailability and is thought to be mainly available in the colon.

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Automation of a Generic Fluorescence Methyltransferase Activity Assay
X. Amouretti, P. Brescia, P. Banks, G. Prescott, Meera Kumar

Epigenetic processes are attracting considerable attention in drug discovery as their fundamental roles in controlling normal cell development and contributions to disease states become more clearly defined. This work combines a fluorescence-based assay with liquid handling and dispensing instrumentation and a multi-mode reader which can be used to monitor the biological activity of the histone methyltransferase (HMT) G9a, a model system.

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UBS109, a novel curcumin analogue, promotes apoptosis in Head and Neck cancer cells through activating death receptor signaling pathway
Shujue Lan1,3, Min Heui Yoo1, Yuhong Du1,3, Terry Moore4 , Shijun Zhu2, Mamoru Shoji2, Georgia Chen2, Dong Shin2, Fadlo Khuri2, Dennis Liotta4, James P. Snyder4, Haian Fu1,2,3

UBS109, a new curcumin analogue, exhibited a potent anticancer activity, inhibiting colony formation and cancer cell growth in vitro, and tumor growth in a xenograft animal model in vivo. 2. UBS109 rapidly blocks the NF-?B signaling pathway through the

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miREC: A database of miRNAs involved in endometrial cancer
Benjamin Ulfenborg, Sanja Jurcevic, Angelica Lindlöf, Karin Klinga-Levan, Björn Olsson

The miREC database integrates public data about miRNAs and their target genes involved in the development of EAC in human, collected from recent literature. In future versions the database will be complemented with information derived by analyzing our in-house data and new published data by other researchers. The miREC database is the first database that focuses on integrating all available information about genes and miRNAs involved in endometrial cancer.

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MicroRNA expression in normal and malignant prostate tissues
Jessica Carlsson

In this study the aim was to identify a miRNA expression signature that could be used to separate between normal and malignant prostate tissues. Nine miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed and they could be used to separate between the normal and malignant tissues. A cross-validation procedure confirmed the generality of this expression signature, showing an accuracy of 85%.

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Showing Results 21 - 30 of 140
Scientific News
Bowel Cancer Breakthrough May Benefit Thousands of Patients
Researchers at Queen’s University have discovered how two genes cause bowel cancer cells to become resistant to treatments used against the disease.
Study Finds Low Oxygen Environment Helps Tumors Silence Critical Genes
The study led by Yale Cancer Center may provide clues to how some aggressive cancers turn off, or silence, genes critical to suppressing tumors.
Researchers Uncover New Cancer Cell Vulnerability
The research showed that telomerase-expressing cells depend upon a gene named p21 for their survival.
Self-assembling Nanoparticle Could Improve MRI Scanning for Cancer Diagnosis
Scientists have designed the nanoparticle that targets tumours, to help doctors diagnose cancer earlier.
Wisconsin Scientists Find Genetic Recipe to Turn Stem Cells to Blood
The ability to reliably and safely make in the laboratory all of the different types of cells in human blood is one key step closer to reality.
Capturing Cancer: A Powerful New Technique for Early Diagnosis
Researchers describe an innovative technique for early disease detection, which they call immunosignaturing.
Study Identifies Novel Genomic Changes in the Most Common Type of Lung Cancer
TCGA finds mutations in a key cancer-causing pathway, expanding targets for existing drugs.
Low Doses of Arsenic Cause Cancer in Male Mice
NIH researchers found that arsenic in drinking water develop lung cancer.
Brain Tumor Invasion Along Blood Vessels May Lead to New Cancer Treatments
NIH-funded researchers find brain tumor cells disrupt the brain’s protective barrier, offering potential avenues for therapy.
Revealing the Role of “Precocious” Dendritic Cells in Inflammatory Response
Discovery makes it possible for researchers to explore how these “precocious” cells escalate the body’s immune response when the body is under attack.
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