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Caliper - Labchip XT/XTe

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Advanced Nucleic Acid Size Selection and Collection

•    Reduce wasted "non-align" reads with tight size selection
•    Increase average read length by excluding shorter fragments
•    Faster sample processing maximizes use of sequencer
•    Reduce waste and exposure to harmful reagents

The LabChip XT performs fast, automated nucleic acid fractionation accurately and reproducibly using Caliper's proprietary microfluidics. The resulting sample is tightly sized and is delivered in a sequencing compatible buffer. The XT improves laboratory efficiency and provides sizing that is difficulty to obtain using manual methods. Data is displayed digitally and non-fractionated sample can be recollected and used at another time.

Current next generation sequencing workflows have numerous manual processes that bottleneck throughput and contribute to process inefficiency. One of the most time consuming tasks is gel-based size-selection during the library generation process. In addition to being labor intensive and not scalable, manual methods introduce run-to-run and operator-to-operator variability. Furthermore, the imprecision of this manual excision results in the size selection precision (width of the selected band) being typically no better than ± 10% of the median fragment size (e.g. 400 bp ± 40 bp).

Application

•    Next Generation Sequencing Technologies (NextGen Sequencing)
•    Electrophoretic Fractionation
•    DNA Electrophoresis
•    RNA Electrophoresis
•    PCR Sequencing
•    Nucleic Acid Collection
•    Nucleic Acid Electrophoresis
•    Nucleic Acid Fractionation
•    Nucleic Acid Quantification
•    Nucleic Acid Size Selection
•    Sequencing Library Preparation

Product Caliper - Labchip XT/XTe
Company Caliper Life Sciences
Price Request a quote
More Information View company product page
Catalog Number Unspecified
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Caliper Life Sciences
68 Elm Street Hopkinton, MA 01748 USA

Tel: 1.508.435.9500
Fax: 1.508.435.3439



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