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Agilent Opens New Customer Applications and Training Center in South Korea

Published: Wednesday, September 12, 2012
Last Updated: Wednesday, September 12, 2012
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First Clean Room for Agilent in South Asia Pacific.

Agilent Technologies Inc. has opened a new Customer Applications and Training Center in South Korea, showcasing its latest bio-analytical instruments.

The company's goal is to collaborate with customers to develop new applications and methodologies for research in the agriculture, environment and semiconductor industries.

The center will also help train chemists and engineers in the South Asia and Pacific region on the use of cutting-edge spectroscopy and mass-spectrometry instruments and technologies.

Unique to the center is a clean room designed for engineers, chemists and other scientists in the semiconductor industry to conduct tests and studies of materials using Agilent's latest atomic and molecular spectroscopy instruments.

This Class1000-certified clean room is maintained to ensure a very low level of environmental pollutants such as dust, airborne microbes, aerosol particles and chemical vapors, specifically less than 1,000 such particles per cubic foot.

"South Korea is an important market for Agilent," said Dr. Chai-Hock Teng, vice president and general manager of Agilent's Chemical Analysis Group in South Korea and the South Asia Pacific region.

Dr. Teng continued, "The country is home to some of the world's top electronics manufacturers, major Asian and international pharmaceutical and chemical firms, as well as other industrial giants. To better support our customers as they grow and push the boundaries of science, we have established the Agilent Customer Applications and Training Center to offer collaboration and training programs.

"This center is also available to customers outside of South Korea. In fact, we look forward to bringing together customers from the South Asia Pacific region and playing our part in shaping high standards in the agriculture, environment and semiconductor industries."

The new center enables Agilent's customers to conduct research and analysis of inorganic materials and compounds in semiconductors, materials science, environment and agriculture.

"This Customer Application and Training Center complements our existing organic and bioscience centers in South Korea," said Douglas Janson, country operations manager for Agilent's Chemical Analysis Group in South Korea.

Janson continued, "We are responding to our customers' growing needs for compound identification, greater sensitivity and lower detection limits. The state-of-the-art technologies in the center will help to increase confidence in the results they produce.

"Our customer partnerships help them ensure that agricultural produce and drinking water are safe for consumption or that new compounds can be used safely and effectively in our phones or household appliances. In-depth research will be done to understand them, and rigorous tests will be conducted to ensure their safety and reliability," explained Janson.

"Together, Agilent and South Korea's scientific community will increase our collaborations and develop new applications that can be deployed throughout Asia and the world."

The new center has the most advanced Agilent bio-analytical instruments. Through these instruments, scientists can detect, identify and quantify chemicals.

In addition to research and collaboration facilities, the new center will offer specialized training programs for scientists, chemists and engineers in South Korea or various Asian markets.

The center is located in the Gangnam area in Seoul and is staffed by a team of experienced chemists and engineers. Instruments at this center include:

• The Agilent 4100 Microwave Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometer: R&D Magazine included this instrument in its prestigious R&D 100 as one of the most technologically significant products introduced into the marketplace in 2011.
• The Agilent 8800 triple quadrupole ICP-MS: The first and only instrument of its kind, the Agilent 8800 analyzes problematic elements in samples across a range of applications.
• The Agilent Cary 630 FTIR spectrometer: This instrument analyzes a range of solids, liquids and gases accurately and quickly. It received the 2012 Instrument Business Outlook (IBO) Industrial Design Gold Award.
• The Agilent 4100 ExoScan handheld Fourier transform infrared spectrometer: This device can accurately analyze carbon-fiber composites.

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