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Mettler-Toledo Safeline Launches the Next Generation in X-ray Inspection

Published: Tuesday, October 23, 2012
Last Updated: Tuesday, October 23, 2012
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Revolutionary X-ray system from Mettler-Toledo Safeline offers exceptional inspection sensitivity and reduces energy consumption by 20 per cent.

A revolutionary x-ray system designed by Mettler-Toledo Safeline X-ray gives food and pharmaceutical manufacturers the same high level of foreign body detection sensitivity as a traditional x-ray system using just a fifth of the power.

Developed as a result of collaboration between Mettler-Toledo Safeline X-ray and its customers the X3310’s detector technology represents the next generation of x-ray inspection.

The X3310’s sensitive x-ray detector boosts exceptional detection of foreign bodies such as glass, metal, stone, high-density plastic and bone fragments, as well as simultaneously performing gross mass measurement for calculated portion control.

The x-ray system is ideally suited to the inspection of small and medium sized packaged products and gives food and pharmaceutical manufacturers the market-leading product inspection technology needed to guarantee superior product safety.

The system has a single vertical x-ray beam and is available in 300mm or 400mm detector widths to suit a wide range of applications.

The technology uses a 20 watt x-ray generator rather than the 100 watt generator used in traditional x-ray machines, lowering energy consumption and reducing total cost of ownership (TCO).

This also results in a reduction of x-ray emissions meaning thinner stainless steel is used for the x-ray cabinet, making the machine more environmentally friendly.

Under typical operating conditions, the entire X3310 system uses 20 per cent less energy, significantly reducing manufacturing costs for food and pharmaceutical manufacturers.

This overall reduced power consumption eliminates the need for a complex cooling system, allowing the X3310 to be housed in a slimline 300mm cabinet.

The reduced footprint increases installation flexibility for food and pharmaceutical manufacturers with limited factory floor space.

The new technology’s reduced x-ray power output has enabled Mettler-Toledo Safeline X-ray to incorporate a larger window on the reject bin than traditional systems, facilitating straight-forward calibration of the rejection system and simplifying product set-up.

In addition, the machine’s casing is hygienically designed for easy cleaning, with curved and sloping surfaces enabling water to run-off.

“The X3310 system is the cutting edge of product inspection”, says Daniela Verhaeg, Marketing Manager, Mettler-Toledo Safeline X-ray.

Verhaeg continued, “Our revolutionary x-ray system maximizes productivity and profitability for food and pharmaceutical manufacturers, reduces energy consumption while meeting and exceeding global and retailer food safety initiatives”.

In comparison with earlier generations of x-ray inspection systems, the control system for the X3310 has been simplified to lower maintenance time and costs, without losing any functionality or performance.

The system has been designed with gas-strut assisted lids and doors for ease of access to internal mechanisms.

The machine’s light-emitting diode (LED) backlit touch screen display is twice the size of those used in standard x-ray detectors and is set at the global average operator height.

To further facilitate access, quarter turn door locks have been added to the front of the system and an enhanced tracking system simplifies conveyor set-up.

The X3310 provides an improved user experience with new software and a fully-updated user interface.

The X3310’s new Ethernet-enabled software is icon driven and features touch and scroll, enabling the operator to have full control over the system and ensuring it is easy to use with minimal training and without previous x-ray knowledge.


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