Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Spectroscopy
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Linkam Reports on the Use of FTIR600 Stage at the University of Rome Tre

Published: Wednesday, January 02, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, January 01, 2013
Bookmark and Share
The Linkam FTIR600 Stage is used in combination with FTIR spectroscopy to image large and multi-phase samples and monitor fast dynamic processes.

Linkam Scientific Instruments report on the use of their FTIR600 stage at the University of Rome Tre to visualize and measure the in-situ dehydration of silicate materials.

Geologists are interested in the distribution of volatile constituents across mineral crystals as this can provide insight into the crystallization process.

This is now possible to investigate using modern FTIR imaging capabilities. On the Earth's crust, water bearing minerals are common.

How these minerals dehydrate is important as this can give clues about dehydration-induced earthquakes and phase transformations at non-ambient conditions.

At the University of Rome Tre, Professor Giancarlo Della Ventura and his colleagues are using the Linkam FTIR600 stage to look at dehydration and absorption characteristics of water in various minerals.

The team has demonstrated the ability to monitor the distribution of an absorber vs. time across various samples. Dehydration curves can be obtained by collecting single-spot data in situ.

The band intensity of H20/OH absorption is measured at each step during the heating process and plotted against the in situ data.

Professor Della Ventura said the greatest benefit of using a Linkam stage is the "possibility to perform experiments in situ, i.e. during the thermal treatment simulation."

Previously, fluid inclusions in minerals as small as 1-2µm wide have been studied using Raman spectroscopy as this had the capability to measure them.

With the increased availability of synchrotron-radiation FTIR facilities and the development of FTIR imaging techniques under synchrotron and conventional light, FTIR can now be used to study these samples.

FTIR spectroscopy is a very powerful tool for the high-temperature studies of volatile species. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy can be used to obtain an infrared spectrum of the absorption of a liquid, solid or gas.

This infrared collection of data can be over a wide spectral range, making the FTIR an important tool in the study of minerals.

Leucite is a rock forming potassium and aluminium tectosilicate mineral with ideal composition K[AlSi2O6]. For leucite to be present, the rock must be low in silica as leucite will react with it to form feldspar.

The Tre group studied the mechanism of dehydration in leucite samples from the Alban Hills and Vico volcanoes, Italy. In the first experiments, the crystal fragment was heated at 5°Cmin-1.

Focal Plane Array (FPA) images were taken at 100°C intervals, using a 15x objective of the ~250x250µm2of a 190µm thick crystal fragment. By illuminating a ~170x170µm2 area of the crystal, they were able to enhance the contrast of the water band at the edge of the crystal.

During the experiment, the sample dehydrates smoothly, and at 400°C, it is almost anhydrous. In a second experiment, a second crystal is heated more quickly at 50°Cmin-1 to 300°C.

When the sample reaches 300°C it has lost nearly 50% of its water. At 300°C, images were taken at intervals and show the slow dehydration and after 150 min, the sample is nearly anhydrous.

This technique has been shown to provide unique opportunities to study phenomena occurring in isotropic and anisotropic materials. The use of FTIR allows for the study of areas a few µm thick and high resolution images in a very short time provides new means to study in situ, fast dynamic phenomena under non-ambient conditions.

Thermal treatments, dehydration processes and many other non-equilibrium processes can now be more extensively studied in many interesting geological systems.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Kwansei Gakuin University in Hyogo, Japan, Uses Raman Microscopy
Raman Microscopy study crystallographic defects in silicon carbide wafers.
Structural Discoveries Could Aid in Better Drug Design
Scientists have uncovered the structural details of how some proteins interact to turn two different signals into a single integrated output.
X-ray Laser Experiment Could Help in Designing Drugs for Brain Disorders
Scientists found that when two protein structures in the brain join up, they act as an amplifier for a slight increase in calcium concentration, triggering a gunshot-like release of neurotransmitters from one neuron to another.
Team Identifies Structure of Tumor-Suppressing Protein
An international group of researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University physicists Mathias Lösche and Frank Heinrich have established the structure of an important tumor suppressing protein, PTEN.
Major Innovation in Molecular Imaging Delivers Spatial and Spectral Info Simultaneously
Berkeley Lab scientist invents technique to combine spectroscopy with super-resolution microscopy, enabling new ways to examine cell structures and study diseases.
Helicobacter Pylori's Secret Weapon
Finding the molecular interactions that make this pathogen so successful in such a harsh environment has, until now, proved elusive.
Unprecedented Insights Into the Reactions Powering Fuel Cells
Nanotech-enabled chip developed at UCLA can analyze chemical reactions more accurately than large machines
Ultrafast Laser Pulses for Spectroscopy and Biomedical Applications
Graphene Flagship researchers have developed an optical fibre laser that emits pulses with durations equivalent to just a few wavelengths of the light used. This fastest ever laser based on graphene will be ideal for use in ultrafast spectroscopy, and in surgical lasers that avoid heat damage to living tissue.
Device May Detect Urinary Tract Infections Faster
A Lab-on-a-Disc platform developed by a German and Irish team of researchers dramatically cut the time to detect bacterial species that cause urinary tract infections -- a major cause of sepsis.
New Hybrid Microscope Offers Unparalleled Capabilities
A microscope being developed at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory will allow scientists studying biological and synthetic materials to simultaneously observe chemical and physical properties on and beneath the surface.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!