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Hamamatsu Photonics Introduces G11097-0707S

Published: Friday, April 19, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, April 19, 2013
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New 2D InGaAs image sensor is ideal, low cost solution to a wide range of industrial applications.

Hamamatsu Photonics has introduced the G11097-0707S, a brand new 128 x 128 pixel two dimensional InGaAs image sensor, that compliments the existing range of high performance linear and area image sensors.

The G11097-0707S consists of a CMOS readout integrated circuit (ROIC) and a back illuminated InGaAs photodiode array, which are connected via indium bumps on a hybrid structure.

The G11097-0707S features simultaneous charge integration and a 5MHz video data rate. Also included within the ROIC is a timing generator to allow simplified operation.

Featuring large 50µm by 50µm pixels, the G11097-0707S offers high sensitivity in the 0.95 µm to 1.7µm infrared region, with excellent linearity characteristics.

Housed in a 28-pin metal package with a one stage thermoelectric cooler, the G111097-0707S features a low dark current and high signal-to-noise ratio, allowing the sensor to be used in more demanding imaging applications.

The G11097-0707S is the ideal, low cost solution to a wide range of industrial applications, including low resolution thermal imaging, laser beam profiling, NIR image detection, foreign object detection and many more.


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