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Hamamatsu Linear CMOS Image Sensor with APS Technology

Published: Friday, April 19, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, April 19, 2013
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S11638 CMOS linear image sensor offers direct UV sensitivity.

Hamamatsu Photonics has introduced the S11638 CMOS linear image sensor with APS (Active Pixel Sensor) technology. APS technology allows the S11638 to achieve a combination of a very high sensitivity, at 160 V/(lx•s), and a fast video data rate of 10 MHz. This is accomplished by simultaneously integrating charge for all pixels.

The S11638 offers direct UV sensitivity, with a spectral response range from 200nm to 1000nm. Direct UV sensitivity removes the costly and inefficient need to coat sensors for an enhanced UV response.

The S11638 also features an electronic shutter function, and a built-in timing generator allowing operation with only start and clock pulse inputs.

The S11638 features a long effective active area of 28.672mm, consisting of 2048 pixels.

Each pixel measures 14µm by 42µm. The sensor features very simple operation and only requires a single 5V power supply to run.

The S11638 then becomes an ideal solution for various high precision and high speed applications, particularly in the UV region including; spectrometers, position detection, encoders, image reading, barcode readers and many more.

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