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New Eppendorf PlateReader AF2200

Published: Friday, June 21, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, June 21, 2013
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New PlateReader simplifies set-up and analysis for UV/Vis and fluorescence measurements.

The new Eppendorf PlateReader AF2200 is a highly user-friendly device for quantifying biomolecules, such as nucleic acids and proteins, and for measuring fluorescence-based assays in plate format and is designed to simplify both set-up procedures and data analysis.

The AF2200’s convenient hardware and software solutions are engineered for ease-of-use and include integrated temperature control and plate-shaking options, as well as pre-programmed methods including data analysis and factor-based calculation.

By supporting the instrument with smart accessories, such as the Eppendorf µPlate G0.5 for microvolume applications and pre-configurated filter slides, Eppendorf delivers a complete solution for life scientists across many applications.

It is especially valuable where analysis is in the UV/Vis range and/or involves a wide range of fluorescence dyes.

“The software of the PlateReader AF2200 provides the user with pre-programmed applications and a flexible selection of individual parameters,” says Dr Tanja Musiol, Global Product Manager Detection at Eppendorf AG.

Dr Musiol continued, “It also offers the option to freely program all parameters in order to meet individual requirements. Our pre-configured filter slides are optimized to the pre-programmed methods and are designed to offer the highest flexibility while preventing cross talk. The whole system is developed to simplify set-up procedures and data analysis - making daily lab work easier.”

The broad range of accessories that accompanies the PlateReader AF2200 includes pre-configured filter slides with optimized filter assignment.

A choice of 70 additional filters is also available to enable users to tailor measurements for highly specific applications.


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