Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Spectroscopy
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

BioSilta Introduces EnPresso B Growth Systems for Bacterial Cultures

Published: Monday, June 24, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, June 24, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Systems increase yields and improve functionality of recombinant proteins.

BioSilta Oy announced the commercial launch of the first products in its proprietary EnPresso® B range of reagent-based growth systems for bacterial cultures. Extensive results from independent labs around the world have confirmed that these new products typically increase protein yields by five to 100-fold and improve protein functionality when compared to results using conventional growth media.

The EnPresso B range has been developed in response to findings from market research involving over 1,200 scientists routinely growing bacterial cultures for the expression of recombinant proteins at laboratory scale. The majority of respondees highlighted insufficient yield, followed by quality problems such as poor protein solubility or low activity, as their main challenges.

The products are EnPresso B, EnPresso B Animal-free (supplied with documentation to certify that the product is free from animal-derived components), and EnPresso B Defined Nitrogen-free, used to significantly increase the yield of 15N-labeled proteins for NMR analysis.

For ease of use the products are supplied as pre-sterilized tablets, which are simply added to sterile, filtered water. Optimized protocols enable researchers to go from pre-culture to harvest within two days, using standard lab equipment such as shake flasks or 24 deep well plates.

The EnPresso B range incorporates the Company’s patented EnBase® technology that offers a novel approach to control the feeding, and thereby growth rate, of microbial cultures. A glucose-releasing agent breaks down long chains of polysaccharides, releasing glucose units to feed the microbes. As well as glucose, EnPresso tablets provide other key elements to support growth and control pH. Cells grow steadily to reach higher densities before induction of protein expression and continue in linear growth for many hours after induction. Proteins are expressed under optimal metabolic conditions thereby reducing the risk of incorrect folding and increasing the percentage of soluble protein. In contrast, microbes cultivated in conventional media grow in an uncontrolled manner, consuming nutrients, changing pH and depleting oxygen. Growth stops within hours, limiting protein yields and ‘too fast’ metabolism produces poor quality proteins.

Bob Penney, CEO, BioSilta Oy, said: “In our market research over 70% of scientists confirmed that their main challenge when producing recombinant proteins in bacterial systems was insufficient yield, followed by problems with poor solubility and functionality. We firmly believe that EnPresso B growth systems very significantly address these issues and will revolutionize the role of bacterial cell culture in protein expression. Scientists will spend less time optimizing expression systems and more time focused on their true research objectives.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,900+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Revealing the Secrets of 19th Century Fashion Industry
The dye industry of the 19th century was fast-moving and international, according to a state-of-the-art analysis of four purple dresses.
How Nanoparticles Damage Immune Cells
New evidence points to protein oxidation, a common means of molecular damage.
Single Molecule Detection of Contaminants, Explosives or Diseases
A technique that combines the ultrasensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with a slippery surface invented by Penn State researchers will make it feasible to detect single molecules of a number of chemical and biological species from gaseous, liquid or solid samples.
Extracting Uranium from Seawater
An ultra-high-resolution technique used for the first time to study polymer fibers that trap uranium in seawater may cause researchers to rethink the best methods to harvest this potential fuel for nuclear reactors.
Innovation Boosts Study of Fragile Biological Samples
Researchers have found a simple new way to study very delicate biological samples – like proteins at work in photosynthesis and components of protein-making machines called ribosomes – at the atomic scale using SLAC's X-ray laser.
Clues for Battling Botulism
Scientists decipher details of deadly toxin's cloaking mechanism that could guide development of new vaccines, treatments.
The US ARL in Maryland Combines Raman Spectroscopy and AFM
Characterizing electrochemical energy storage materials.
Closing the Loop on an HIV Escape Mechanism
Research team finds that protein motions regulate virus infectivity.
New Analysis Technique for Chiral Activity in Molecules
Professor Hyunwoo Kim of the Chemistry Department and his research team have developed a technique that can easily analyze the optical activity of charged compounds by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.
Miniaturizable Magnetic Resonance
Microscopic gem the key to new development in magnetic lab-on-a-chip technology.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,900+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,200+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!